habitat

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habitat

the place where something or someone lives. In ENVIRONMENTAL LAW the focus of European Union and UK legislation affecting conduct in relation to certain habitats. The EU Habitats Directive requires the establishment of a series of high-quality Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) across Europe that will make a significant contribution to conserving the habitat types and species identified in Annexes I and II of the Directive. It has been held that the Directive extends UK obligations beyond the 12-mile limit to the UK continental shelf
References in periodicals archive ?
It said: 'The secretary shall designate critical habitats outside protected areas under Republic Act 7586, where threatened species are found.
He said that there was a need to review the existing scenario of wildlife diversity in the Province including species diversity, habitat diversity, endemic species and threatened species.
Vegetative structure of selected habitats in Salt Range: Forty three plants species were recorded from habitats of Grey francolin in study area including nine trees, six shrubs, sixteen herbs, nine grasses and three agricultural crops.
But as more jaguars seek out fewer healthy habitats, the jaguar population decreases.
Overall, some 13% of the evaluations of regional habitats and 27% of regional species were reported as "unknown".
We have shown how the CoRT thinking skills helped a teacher provide needed scaffolding for an open-ended science problem on bird habitats. Not only was the teacher new to problem-based learning, but this was also her first time using the CoRT thinking skills.
In 1993, we began stringent training restrictions in warbler and vireo habitat during the breeding season that affected over 29 percent of the installation.
Monica Vidal, an associate broker with Citi Habitats since January 2004, has been promoted to sales manager of the firm's Midtown East office.
Disappearing forests create fragmented habitats, leading chimps and gorillas to live in tighter quarters.
Stephanie Stowell, director of the National Wildlife Federation's Schoolyard Habitats program, says she's seen everything from a 35-acre space in a schoolyard with natural forest down to 3x5 foot window boxes in downtown Detroit.