Code of Hammurabi

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Code of Hammurabi

The Code of Hammurabi was a comprehensive set of laws, considered by many scholars to be the oldest laws established; they were handed down four thousand years ago by King Hammurabi of Babylon. Although the Code of Hammurabi was essentially humanitarian in its intent and orientation, it contained the "eye for an eye" theory of punishment, which is a barbarian application of the concept of making the punishment fit the crime. The Code of Hammurabi recognized such modern concepts as that of corporate personality.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that Nigeria is bigger than anyone that is within the country today and the attempted deification of certain persons in the last Senate will never happen again, where some people felt that anything coming from the Executive is Hammurabi's Law that cannot be challenged.
As for himself, may she deliver him into the hands of his enemies, and may they carry him away in bonds to the land hostile to him." (17) In another instance in Hammurabi's law we read: "May Zababa, the mighty warrior, the firstborn son of Ekur, who marches at the right hand, shatter his weapons on the field of battle!
B.'s cursory reading of Deuteronomy 17 contrasts it with the imperial realities implicit in Hammurabi's Law Code, rather than reading this chapter against Israel's own struggles with kingship before and during the exile.
Hammurabi's law dictated that "if a beer seller receives money, or makes the beer measure smaller than the barley measure received, the judges shall throw her into the water," and they did order the drowning of one female saloon keeper.
In Hammurabi's law collection, for example, the laws regarding the goring ox began with a case in which the ox is a victim and proceed by degrees up to the case in which a human is a victim.
Hammurabi's laws, inscribed on stone tablets, set legal standards for tort, inheritance, contract, and family law that established principles that are still relevant today.
Hammurabi's laws did not contain many safeguards that we take for granted today.