Handbill


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HANDBILL. A printed or written notice put up on walls, &c., in order to inform those concerned of something to be done.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Jethro laid aside the Handbill without any visible appearance of agitation.
On the point of leaving the house, he remembered that Emily would probably expect him to return the Handbill. As he took it up, the first lines caught his eye: he read the date at which the murder had been committed, for the second time.
Following the impulse that urged him, he secured the Handbill in his pocketbook--snatched up the card which his patient had presented as her introduction--and instantly left the house.
Old File, Young File, and myself were all dishonorably mentioned together in a second paragraph, as runaways of inferior importance Not a word was said in the handbill to show that the authorities at Barkingham even so much as suspected the direction in which any one of us had escaped.
"They've printed handbills at Barkingham, offering a reward for taking him.
I put the handbills in my pocket, and listened for any hints which might creep out in his talk; but he perversely kept silent.
The coach stopped for dinner; and some of our passengers left us, the excitable man with the handbills among the number.
'Pray, madam,' said Mr Dorrit, referring to the handbill again,
He therefore resolved that he would take advantage of that evening's freedom to go down to Clennam and Co.'s, easily to be found by the direction set forth in the handbill; and see the place, and ask a question or two there himself.
Flintwinch, show the gentleman the handbill. Give him several to take away.
Two of the handbills were posted on the entrance wall, one on either side, and as the lamp flickered in the night air, shadows passed over them, not unlike the shadows of fingers following the lines.
The handbills of the selectmen would cause the commitment of all the vagabonds in the State; the paragraph in the Parker's Falls Gazette would be reprinted from Maine to Florida, and perhaps form an item in the London newspapers; and many a miser would tremble for his money bags and life, on learning the catastrophe of Mr.