heading

(redirected from Headings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

heading

1 words prefixed to the start of sections of Acts of Parliament. These may be utilized in statutory interpretation.
2 in Scottish civil procedure, the part of an initial writ that specifies the particular court jurisdiction in which an action is raised.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the notes for takeoff minimums and departure procedures simply state that this is how it would be flown for Runways 4L and 4R: "Climbing right turn to 2400 heading 100" before proceeding on course." That's it.
They filled out questionnaires detailing their recent (previous two weeks) on-field activity, including heading and unintentional head impacts.
Crisis-hit Southern states, which depend on both these headings, such as Spain, Portugal and Greece, will probably faint at the proposal.
The Presidency found relatively little fat to cut in the smallest of all headings (3, Security and Citizenship).
According to our analysis, Turkey will be able to open 16 more chapter headings in case political obstacles are removed.
However, the statewide averages for each grade were in the correct columns and under the correct headings.
KidsClick, designed by a group of librarians at the Ramapo Catskill Library System in New York, uses a simplified metadata scheme including only five elements: Web address, title of site, brief description (abstract), reading level, and subject headings. The KidsClick metadata scheme has been adopted by the Colorado Virtual Library for Kids with an additional metadata element added for content standards to make it useful for teachers who access the collection (Bailey-Hainer, 2001).
The FTC suggested the focus should shift from subject-line headings to the development of new technology, such as e-mail authentication.
Levels of headings. The levels of headings can provide the writer with a logical sequencing of ideas.
In our catalogs we assign to music terms that we disingenuously call subject headings, but surely this is an illusion.
Its features include thousands of Relative Index terms and built numbers not available in the print version of the DDC; Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) that have been statistically mapped to Dewey numbers from records in WorldCat and intellectually mapped by the DDC's editors; 35,000 of the over 50,000 LCSH found in the OCLC Forest Press publication People, Places & Things; links from mapped LCSH to the LCSH authority records; and quarterly database updates that incorporate the latest changes to the DDC, LCSH mappings, index terms, and built numbers.