advance directive

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Related to Health care proxy: Durable power of attorney

advance directive

a declaration by a person in relation to medical treatment (usually to instruct that it stop) to provide for a situation in which he might himself be unable to comment, e.g. the so-called living will. The US Supreme Court established the right for a person to refuse medical treatment, which in the case of a comatose patient can be difficult to establish. This is an issue that is troubling most legal systems because it raises moral, philosophical and practical questions. In the UK the directive is legally effective because treatment requires consent. It need not be in writing. It cannot, however, compel doctors to cease treatment so as to mercy-kill or provide treatment which they do not consider to be in the best interests of the patient.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, there are two types of advance directives to consider: the health care proxy or the living will.
Whether you have named someone in the Health Care Proxy form to make healthcare decisions on your behalf or someone becomes your proxy under the Family Health Care Decisions Act when they are faced with having to make medical decisions on your behalf during your time of need is it better that they know what you would want?
For example, a student once asked why the Massachusetts Health Care Proxy form makes the Proxy's signature optional.
Although living wills can be tricky, experts have no reservations about recommending that people have a health care proxy. Some even suggest, for example, that naming someone for that role should be a routine task that's part of applying for a driver's license.
5@55: The 5 Essential Legal Documents You Need By Age 55 comes from two elder law attorneys and provides a slim but information-packed discussion of the five most important legal documents one needs at age 55: a Will, a Health Care Proxy, a Living Will, a Power of Attorney and a Digital Diary.
These documents are a Will, Health Care Proxy, Living Will, Power of Attorney and Digital Diary, a new form that is becoming increasingly important to authorize designated representative to access your computer and online accounts.
You will need to choose a health care proxy, a person who will make health care decisions for you in the event you cannot do so.
Regardless of the family financial situation, you might suggest that clients urge parents to execute a health care proxy and a durable power of attorney.
When a patient comes into the hospital, part of the admission process is asking if he/she has a health care proxy or a do not resuscitate order (DNR).
HEALTH CARE PROXY: program is Monday, May 4, at 12:30 p.m., at The Senior Center, Butterick Municipal Building, 1 Park St.
"We want to create an environment where everybody feels comfortable having these conversations and designates a health care proxy to speak on their behalf if they can't make decisions for themselves."
Do you have a will, a durable power of attorney or a health care proxy? Have you updated your beneficiary designations on your retirement accounts?

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