Herbage


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Related to Herbage: permeate, barrage, dissipation, foliage, fallible

HERBAGE, English Law, A species of easement, which consists in the right to feed one's cattle on another man's ground.

References in classic literature ?
Numerous and populous villages of long low huts stretched away between broad pasture-fields whose dense herbage was besprinkled with violet-colored blossoms.
Here and there on the sides of the hills, or along the alluvial borders and bottoms of the ravines, are groves and skirts of forest: but for the most part the country presented to the eye a boundless waste, covered with herbage, but without trees.
Now and then a herd of deer would be seen feeding tranquilly among the flowery herbage, or a line of buffaloes, like a caravan on its march, moving across the distant profile of the prairie.
From a coarse herbage we passed on to a carpet of fine green verdure.
Before their introduction, however, the surface must have supported, as in other parts, a rank herbage. I doubt whether any case is on record of an invasion on so grand a scale of one plant over the aborigines.
This body was collected on the very margin of that mass of herbage in which the trapper and his companions were hid.
However, when the orchardgrass-white clover scenario was pushed to its maximum utilization (80% herbage utilization + grain supplementation), the [[NO.sub.3].sup.-]N concentration in the leachate would approach those under the N fertilized orchardgrass scenario at 80% herbage utilization (Figure 3).
In the past, this method was conducted in a central processing facility so herbage, which contains about 80 percent water, had to be transported from the field.
Recent studies have shown that invertebrates can remove a substantial amount of herbage in wetlands (Scott and Haskins, 1987; Foote et al., 1988).
So [tool we have abandoned those couches littered with herbage and heaped with leaves.
A herb-clover mix containing plantain (Plantago lanceolata), chicory (Cichorium intybus), red clover (Trifoliumpretense), and white clover (Trifolium repens) has been shown to produce greater herbage yields than a predominant perennial ryegrass-white clover pasture in New Zealand [1, 2].