heteronomous

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heteronomous

subject to an external law, rule, or authority.
References in periodicals archive ?
Philosophy should be "concerned with the absolutely other; it would be heteronomy itself': Levinas, "Philosophy and the Idea of Infinity', above n 54, 47.
Certain groups in favor of life heteronomy stand for life tangibility when it comes to abortion.
It is this structuring compromise between independent content and a form implicitly derived from heteronomy which has fallen apart with the exhaustion of the legacy of the age of religions.
Dasein's relationality, evident through its understanding as "thrown projection" on possibilities proper for its heteronomous constitution, can bring about "genuine failure": it relates Dasein's embeddedness in the world to the shattering of the sovereign self and helps to show that where subjectivity was effortlessly posited, phenomenological examination reveals only heteronomy.
Noland distinguishes between poetry that voices heteronomy on a "level of analogy" and limits its expression to its own textuality, and poetry characterized by a "level of materializing the analogy," for which the multi-media performance artistry of Patti Smith and Laurie Anderson provide examples.
This issue of moral heteronomy and moral autonomy leads us to two important observations.
Whereas heteronomy typically views secularization as a "blasphemous" undertaking soiling the garment of hierarchical authority, and whereas autonomy greets secularization as the "grand achievement" of modernity and the "greatest victory for the lib eration of man," ontonomy construes the same process in a different light: namely, as the tapping of the hidden potential or promise of the world.
Absolute personal autonomy instead of heteronomy under God
Heteronomy asserts that man, being unable to act according to universal reason must be subjected to law strange and superior to him.
62) It takes partial or qualified forms of autonomy not simply as deficient--though they are clearly deficient in some respects--but as illustrative of the continuum on which autonomy and heteronomy can be found, and of the ways that autonomy is developed as a competence.
He argues, "Kant needs otherness in order to avoid the arbitrariness of a pure self-giving subject, but receptivity appears to confront him with a heteronomy that is equally disruptive of a sovereignty of objective necessity.
In this passage, Borowitz brings together autonomy and heteronomy.