lesion

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Related to Hill-Sachs lesion: reverse Hill Sachs lesion, Bankart lesion

lesion

injury or loss. In the civil law jurisdictions the word is often used in the context of an ‘unfair’ loss, as where an adult takes advantage of a minor or someone purchases something for much less than it's worth.

LESION, contracts. In the civil law this term is used to signify the injury suffered, in consequence of inequality of situation, by one who does not receive a full equivalent for what he gives in a commutative contract.
     2. The remedy given for this injury, is founded on its being the effect of implied error or imposition; for in every commutative contract, equivalents are supposed to be given and received. Louis. Code, 1854. Persons of full age, however, are not allowed in point of law to object to their agreements as being injurious, unless the injury be excessive. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 4. But minors are admitted to restitution, not only against any excessive inequality, but against any inequality whatever. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 5; Louis. Code, art. 1858.
     3. Courts of chancery relieve upon terms of redemption and set aside contracts entered into by expectant heirs dealing for their expectancies, on the ground of mere inadequacy of price. 1 Vern. 167; 2 Cox, 80; 2 Cas. in Ch. 136; 1 Vern. 141; 2 Vern. 121; 2 Freem. 111; 2 Vent. 359; 2 Vern. 14; 2 Rep. in Ch. 396; 1 P. W. 312; 1 Bro. C. C. 7; 3 P. Wms. 393, n.; 2 Atk. 133; 2 Ves. 125; 1 Atk. 301; 1 Wils. 286; 1 Wils. 320; 1 Bro. P. 6. ed. Toml. 198; 1 Bro. C. C. 1; 16 Ves. 512; Sugd. on Vend. 231, n. k.; 1 Ball & B. 330; Wightw. 25; 3 Ves. & Bea. 117; 2 Swanst. R. 147, n.; Fonb. notes to the Treatise of Equity, B, 1, c. 2, s. 9. A contract cannot stand where the party has availed himself of a confidential situation, in order to obtain some selfish advantage. Note to Crowe v. Ballard. 1 Ves. jun. 125; 1 Hov. Supp. 66, 7. Note to Wharton v. May. 5 Ves. 27; 1 Hov. Supp. 378. See Catching bargain; Fraud; Sale.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Risk factors for failure after arthroscopic Bankart repair include male sex, young age at the time of initial injury, presence of an ALPSA lesion, presence of an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion, glenoid bone loss greater than 20%, duration of time from injury to surgery, and generalized hyperlaxity.
X-rays of AP and axillary view (Fig.2a) were conducted which showed left posterior locked fracture dislocation of the humeral head and a CT scan (Fig.2b) showed a 40% humeral head defect reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The patient underwent a left shoulder McLaughlin procedure and shoulder Spica in external rotation followed by passive, then active-assisted, and active range of motion and rotator cuff strengthening exercises.
[9] found three factors that were significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent instability: an age <40 years at the time of original dislocation, dislocation during a seizure and the presence of a reverse Hill-Sachs lesion >1.5 [cm.sup.3].
Seki, "Location of the Hill-Sachs lesion in shoulders with recurrent anterior dislocation," Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, vol.
Osteolysis of the coracoid graft is most likely secondary to insufficient vascularization or coracoid-glenoid contact and can lead to re-engagement of a Hill-Sachs lesion. (12) Screw loosening can cause symptomatic coracoid movement, while total screw displacement has been noted to cause major intra-articular damage.
The reverse Hill-Sachs lesion was addressed with transfer of the fractured lesser tuberosity and its attached subscapularis muscle to the anteromedial defect according to McLaughlin's technique modified by Hawkins.
Smalley, "Hill-Sachs 'remplissage': an arthroscopic solution for the engaging Hill-Sachs lesion," Arthroscopy, vol.
This review will focus on osseous defects of the humeral head (Hill-Sachs lesion) and address the pathoanatomy, diagnosis, indications, and surgical techniques for the treatment of these lesions.
Two other commonly found pathologies in previously failed stabilization are bone defects on the glenoid and Hill-Sachs lesions of the humeral head.
Following completion of the deltopectoral approach and joint exposure, the humeral head was externally rotated, a retractor was placed in the joint to protect the glenoid surface, and the Hill-Sachs lesion was exposed.
An engaging Hill-Sachs lesion occurs when the long axis of the impression defect is parallel to the anteroinferior glenoid, allowing the glenoid rim to "fall into" the defect.
Correlation between Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocation.