History


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

HISTORY, evidence. The recital of facts written and given out for true.
     2. Facts stated in histories may be read in evidence, on the ground of their notoriety. Skin. R. 14; 1 Ventr. R. 149. But these facts must be of a public nature, and the general usages and customs of the country. Bull. P. 248; 7 Pet. R. 554; 1 Phil. & Am. Ev. 606; 30 Howell's St. Tr. 492. Histories are not admissible in relation to matters not of a public nature, such as the custom of a particular town, a descent, the boundaries of a county, and the like. 1 Salk. 281; S. C. Skin. 623; T. Jones, 164; 6 C. & P. 586, note. See 9 Ves. 347; 10 Ves. 354; 3 John. 385; 1 Binn. 399; and Notoriety.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
Civil and natural history, the history of art and of literature, must be explained from individual history, or must remain words.
Then at once History becomes fluid and true, and Biography deep and sublime.
In the early history of Asia and Africa, Nomadism and Agriculture are the two antagonist facts.
What is the foundation of that interest all men feel in Greek history, letters, art, and poetry, in all its periods from the Heroic or Homeric age down to the domestic life of the Athenians and Spartans, four or five centuries later?
To the sacred history of the world he has the same key.
They cannot unite him to history, or reconcile him with themselves.
How many times in the history of the world has the Luther of the day had to lament the decay of piety in his own household!
The advancing man discovers how deep a property he has in literature,--in all fable as well as in all history. He finds that the poet was no odd fellow who described strange and impossible situations, but that universal man wrote by his pen a confession true for one and true for all.
One of the reasons why I have chosen this story out of Bede's History is because it contains the picture of the sparrow flitting through the firelit room.
The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, by Bede, translated by Dr.
"But the history of a country is more easily told," said Grandfather.
For these purposes I have employed all the wit and humour of which I am master in the following history; wherein I have endeavoured to laugh mankind out of their favourite follies and vices.

Full browser ?