holding company

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Holding Company

A corporation that limits its business to the ownership of stock in and the supervision of management of other corporations.

A holding company is organized specifically to hold the stock of other companies and ordinarily owns such a dominant interest in the other company or companies that it can dictate policy. Holding companies must comply with the federal antitrust laws that proscribe the secret and total acquisition of the stock of one corporation by another, since this would lessen competition and create a Monopoly.

holding company

n. a company, usually a corporation, which is created to own the stock of other corporations, thereby often controlling the management and policies of all of them.

holding company

a company that controls, usually through a majority shareholding, another company or companies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Language was inserted in the early versions of the correcting legislation expanding the IRA-related provisions to depository holding companies by amending Secs.
private investment firm The Blackstone Group, said that some state legislatures view mutual holding companies as conversions that allow many benefits of demutualizing except they don't deliver value to policyholders.
The guidance is expanded and also includes a general discussion of the November 2001 changes to the risk-based capital rule for bank holding companies in Regulation Y.
The challenge for the SEC is to find a way to supervise the international securities activities of the financial holding companies.
In addition, the agencies must consider changes or reasonably expected changes in the marketplace in which financial holding companies compete, as well as changes or reasonably expected changes in the technology for delivering financial services.
Part 225--Bank Holding Companies and Change in Bank Control (Regulation Y)
10) Subpart J governs the conduct of merchant banking investment activities by financial holding companies as permitted under section 4(k)(4)(H) of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.
5 billion and Total Subsidiary Distributions to Parent and Qualified Holding Companies of $1,065 million (which is comprised of projected subsidiary distributions to parent of $965 million and subsidiary distributions to qualified holding companies of $100 million).
The Federal Reserve Board on August 15, 2000, issued guidance outlining the purpose and scope of its supervision of financial holding companies authorized to engage in a diversified range of financial activities.
Specifically, the ratings reflect the financial profile of the group's operating entities; the diversity of their earnings; their funds flow and capital needs; their strategic business ambitions; and the effect of Taiwan's evolving regulatory environment on financial holding companies.
I appreciate the opportunity to explain the rules recently proposed by the Federal Reserve Board and the Department of the Treasury to allow financial holding companies to engage in merchant banking activities under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley (GLB) Act.