home rule


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Home Rule

The right to local self-government including the powers to regulate for the protection of the public health, safety, morals, and welfare; to license; to tax; and to incur debt.

Home rule involves the authority of a local government to prevent state government intervention with its operations. The extent of its power, however, is subject to limitations prescribed by state constitutions and statutes.

When a municipality or other political subdivision has the power to decide for itself whether to follow a particular course of action without receiving specific approval from state officials, it acts pursuant to such powers. For example, a town exercises its home rule powers when it puts the issue of allowing the sale of alcoholic beverages within its borders on the ballot.

home rule

n. the power of a local city or county to set up its own system of governing and local ordinances without receiving a charter from the state which comes with certain requirements and limitations. The concept has become popular with so-called libertarians, survivalists, and others who would like to divorce local government from as much state regulation as possible. However, few cities and counties have chosen this route. For example, in California, there is one small county (Colusa) out of the 58 which has chosen "home rule." This does not mean they will not take state funds for local improvements.

home rule

noun autonomy, enfranchisement, freedom from domination, freedom from interferrnce, freedom of action, freedom of choice, individualism, noninterference, nonintervention, political independence, self-containment, self-derived power, self-determination, self-direction, self-government, self-legislation, self-reliance, self-subsistence, self-sufficiency, self-support, sovereignty, unlimited sovereignty
References in periodicals archive ?
Khols, JC Penney, or Best Buy), [Post.sub.t] is an indicator for whether or not year t is after 2008 (the bankruptcy year), while [HomeRule.sub.i] is a dummy variable equal to 1 if the city has home rule status based on ACIR (1993) (12).
Column 1 of Table 6 shows no robust, statistically significant difference in sales tax and gross receipt revenue between municipalities that enjoy home rule and municipalities that do not, which is unsurprising: there is no reason why policy flexibility should shield you from the kind of negative revenue shock that a big-box store bankruptcy triggers.
However, there is reason to believe that home rule allows you to recover more swiftly, and we see evidence of that here.
Out of all the municipalities experiencing bankruptcies, the ones with home rule are able to raise about 13% more property tax, charges and fees, and miscellaneous revenue than the ones without.
Now, one may worry that home rule amendments are common to states in a particular region of the country, and that cities in that region rapidly recovered from the big-box store bankruptcies for other reasons.
5 Regression Discontinuity Analysis of Home Rule Status and Revenue Stability
consequences when cities fail to take Home Rule seriously.
consequences extend well beyond Home Rule's prospects; they also
focuses on the role of Home Rule in an era of municipal activism.
policies raise serious questions about the standing of Home Rule today.
Part II examines the relationship that cities have with Home Rule. While
development of Home Rule, thus far they do not seem deeply committed to