range

(redirected from Host range)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Host range: host cells

range

noun ambit, area, arena, boundaries, bounds, breadth, compass, distance, earshot, extent, field, gamut, genus, hearing, limit, line, perimeter, power, reach, scope, space, span, sphere, stretch, sweep
See also: aptitude, area, arrange, capacity, chain, circuit, classify, course, coverage, degree, direction, extent, file, fix, gamut, hierarchy, jurisdiction, latitude, magnitude, perambulate, province, prowl, purview, region, scene, scope, sort, space, sphere

RANGE. This word is used in the land laws of the United States to designate the order of the location of such lands, and in patents from the United States to individuals they are described as being within a certain range.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of more information on the host range of these endoparasitoids, we are left with the general pattern that endoparasitoids typically have more restricted diet breadth and are also more influenced by host plants (although Shaw [1994] urges caution when making sweeping generalizations).
The results of the biometric study of the adult spiraling whitely are similar to the findings in earlier studies regarding the size, egg laying pattern and host range (Waterhouse & Norris, 1989; Gill, 1990; Wijesekera & Kudagamage, 1990; Palaniswami et al.
Floate and Whitham (1993) hypothesize that plant hybrids "bridge" the genetic gap between actual and potential host species, and therefore make it more likely that the insect will evolve an expanded host range.
Although orthopoxviruses are antigenically and genetically similar, they have diverse host range and virulence properties (1-6).
We showed that the host range of the blight pathogen is broader than the host range of the pepper spot pathovar," says Bull.
The book is well organized, with a consistent format to each chapter, which includes history, distribution, host range, etiology, epizootiology, clinical signs, pathogenesis and pathology, diagnosis, immunity, public health concerns, domestic animal health concerns, wildlife impacts, treatment and control, and management strategies.
For instance, several chapters discuss how the degree of trophic specialization by ticks may influence disease incidence: ticks with a narrow host range tend to be associated with high disease incidence.
However, because of its broad host range (De Santis 1967), this parasitoid was dropped from further consideration as a potential biological control agent in North America (Pemberton & Cordo 2001).
It has the widest host range of any fruit fly, is a rapid coloniser and can tolerate cooler climates than other species of fruit flies.
The family Hepadnaviridae comprises 2 genera (Orthohepadnavirus and Avihepadnavirus), and viruses classified within these genera have a narrow host range.
Thus, the host range of IBV does extend beyond the chicken.