misappropriation

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misappropriation

n. the intentional, illegal use of the property or funds of another person for one's own use or other unauthorized purpose, particularly by a public official, a trustee of a trust, an executor or administrator of a dead person's estate, or by any person with a responsibility to care for and protect another's assets (a fiduciary duty). It is a felony (a crime punishable by a prison sentence). (See: fiduciary, embezzlement, theft, larceny)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Inspired by the above mentioned reasons, we proposed a real time hot news recommendation model based on text summarization and Bayesian model from different websites.
The current suit is only the latest in a rash of recent copyright and hot news litigation (3) aimed at combatting news aggregators, or websites and mobile applications that digitally copy headlines and short excerpts of news stories from various Internet sources and display them all in one place.
Theflyonthewall.com was a major setback for companies that want to strengthen the hot news doctrine and use it to shield themselves from new, online competition.
Take a closer look at the South Liverpool property market and the suburb of Hunts Cross is fast becoming hot news on the housing front.
Batman is on our radar again with the incredible live show wowing audiences but the hot news are the pictures of Anne Hathaway as Catwoman in the new movie The Dark Knight Rises.
The "clickjacking" scam adds fake posts on users' news feeds, encouraging them to click on infected links with the lure of hot news items and disaster footage.
And the hot news is that Ricky Gervais has just joined the cast in an as yet unspecified role.
Yet this complex problem may have a simple answer: Amend federal copyright law to again permit news organizations to sue "free riders" who grab their content under the old "hot news" doctrine still recognized by some states.
They requested the court to recognize that "hot news" misappropriation could no longer be practically or fairly applied.
In a recent case involving the Associated Press (AP), the court found that the "hot news misappropriation" doctrine, developed in a 1918 Supreme Court case, could apply to a news aggregator that republished "breaking news" stories on its own website.
Hot news events such as the death of pop singer Michael Jackson also inspired consumers to rush to shop online for merchandises related to the events, the portal site's study shows.
There were few concrete answers as to how to keep writers from ganging up on the same hot news topic.