House of refuge


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HOUSE OF REFUGE, punishment. The name given to a prison for juvenile delinquents. These houses are regulated in the United States on the most humane principles, by special local laws.

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According to the House of Refuge website, close to 20% of Arizona families are living at or below the Federal Poverty Level.
Anyone interested in supporting House of Refuge can reach their "Contact Us" page by clicking here.
At the end of his first year, Curtis found himself at odds with the Board of Managers of the New York House of Refuge.
The second superintendent of the New York House of Refuge, Nathaniel Hart, summarized the approach in these terms to his inmates: "You have experience that must teach you, that if you are good you may be happy, if you are bad you must be miserable" (Hart, pp.
Public and private efforts at curbing delinquency such as the well-known Five Points House of Refuge and the largely unstudied Mercury packet ship for "wild, reckless and semi-criminal lads" all come into view.
Louis House of Refuge and Father Dunne's News Boys' Home and Protectorate.
Through the years, he has extended his reach to the inner city agencies such as the Mustard Seed, House of Refuge Mission, the Hope Mission, the Bissell, and the Boyle Street Community Centre.
The admissions of tiny numbers of black children into the Infirmary and House of Refuge and their even more selective admissions by the private orphanages in the nineteenth century reflected the city's heritage of racial liberalism.
Private and public child-care institutions aspired--however paternalistically--to do good for children, to shape their lives in positive ways: the Cleveland Humane Society and the county child-care agency to find homes for homeless children; the House of Refuge, the Cleveland Boys Farm, and Blossom Hill, to reform children who had broken the law; the orphanages, to preserve children's religious faith and their families; the detention and holding facilities, to provide safety and comfort when children had none; the residential treatment centers, to solve children's emotional difficulties and restore their mental health.
Reformist organizations began to develop asylums for these children like the New York House of Refuge, a cross between orphanage and reform school, where abandoned children could be sheltered and taught decent conduct and a useful trade.
Bill Cosby Live will benefit The Dream Catchers Foundation along with a several local and national charities, such as The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Miracle League, Sierra Club, Rio Grande Charter School, Ronald Mc Donald House, People's Theatre, House of Refuge and Teen Transformation.
The "Girl Problem" is based in large part on the records of one hundred young women incarcerated between 1900 and 1930 in two institutions, the New York State Reformatory for Women at Bedford Hills (of which Katherine Bement Davis was the first superintendent) and the Western House of Refuge for Women at Albion, in upstate New York.