Ibid.

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Ibid.

An abbreviation of the Latin ibidem, meaning "in the same place; in the same book; on the same page."

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In 1906 British doctors lamented that while patriotic doctors were saving lives, selfish couples were preventing the arrival of new citizens (ibid 88).
(49) Ibid. See also Ana Jordan, "'Every Father is a Superhero to his Children': The Gendered Politics of the (Real) Fathers 4 Justice Campaign" (2014) 62 Political Studies 83.
fact that of the roughly 400,000 Africans sold into what is now the United States, approximately 40 percent landed on Sullivan's Island, a hellish Ellis Island of sorts just outside of Charleston Harbor." Egerton, Ibid. Victoria De Grazia employs "White Atlantic" in her Irresistible Empire: America's Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe (Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England: Harvard University Press, 2005), 11, 36-49.
VALENCIA: 30SYJ35, Perellonet, arrojada, 14-VII-1983, VAL-Algae 433-1.30SYJ36, el Saler, arrojada, 14-VII-1983, esporofito, VALAlgae 428-1; Ibid., arrojada, 14-VII-1983, VAL-Algae 423-1.
(77) Ibid [2111]; Galic [IT-98-29-A] (Appeals Chamber) (30 November 2006) at [163]; Krstic [IT-98-33-A] (Appeals Chamber) (19 April 2004) at [218].
Si la alienacion, "es sin duda una fase en la cual se sufre, en la cual hay la enfermedad de la muerte, en la cual hay espacio tambien para la busqueda de la curacion", el niquilismo, es, en cambio, "la idea de ser, improvisamente duenos absolutos del mundo" (Ibid:34), es el rechazo de la curacion.
9-20; Jurgen Kocka, "Losses, Gains and Opportunities: Social History Today," ibid., pp.
Irony is a key term for Flavin, as in this remark: "The radiant tube and the shadow cast by its supporting pan seemed ironic enough to hold alone" (ibid., 87).
(33) Ibid. In obvious reference to the treatment of DuBois for his statements to the press in his capacity as editor.
However both of them would probably not be able to describe it as "beautifully" as Said says Proust does in the first and last volumes of his novel where secondariness and borrowed authority are symbolized so eloquently in a "language of temporal duration" (Ibid.).
(11.) Rosand, 1985, 38-43; Ibid., 1990, 143-64, with a reproduction of the drawing.