ICE

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ICE

abbreviation for INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ENGINEERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also marked the earliest ice formation on the river since Dec.
Because they are so small and sensitive to damage, the nephrons of the kidney must be very carefully cryopreserved so as to avoid freezing and thawing damage from ice formation.
This note is particularly interesting in light of FAA legal defining known icing conditions as "circumstances where a reasonable pilot would expect a substantial likelihood of ice formation on the aircraft based upon all information available to the pilot.
The single-aisle Airbus jet, operated as QZ8501 by Malaysia-based AirAsia's Indonesia affiliate, appears to have flown into a storm cloud, with its engines possibly affected by ice formation, researchers from the Indonesia weather office wrote in a report, citing meteorological data from the flight's last known location over the Java Sea.
Along with showing how ice forms in the root, the images revealed that ice formation in the crown is limited to its lowest and uppermost parts, apparently leaving the middle free of ice--at least free from crystals big enough to visualize.
This ice formation problem causes loss of thrust in engines at high altitude as the crystals form right behind the front fan and impede air flow, which is necessary for thrust.
Ice formation in rail tunnels is a safety issue around the world and icicles falling down onto railway tracks have caused several dangerous derailments over the years.
But achieving a more fundamental understanding of ice formation in aviation fuel is still a subject for intensive research.
The head of Geo Hazards at NIDM, Chandan Ghosh, had said that ISRO faltered by not issuing a warning on ice formation at the Kedar Dome Lake.
The upper part of the modern Arctic Ocean is flushed by North Atlantic currents while the Arctic's deep basins are flushed by salty currents formed during sea ice formation at the surface.
By matching the sediments to what we know of the rocks beneath the ice sheet, we should be able to gain some insight into the history of ice formation and movement in this part of Antarctica.