Memory

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MEMORY. Understanding; a capacity to make contracts, a will, or to commit a crime, so far as intention is necessary.
     2. Memory is sometimes employed to express the capacity of the understanding, and sometimes its power; when we speak of a retentive memory, we use it in the former sense; when of a ready memory, in the latter. Shelf. on Lun. Intr. 29, 30.
     3. Memory, in another sense, is the reputation, good or bad, which a man leaves at his death. This memory, when good, is highly prized by the relations of the deceased, and it is therefore libelous to throw a shade over the memory of the dead, when the writing has a tendency to create a breach of the peace, by inciting the friends and relations of the deceased to avenge the insult offered to the family. 4 T. R. 126; 5 Co. R. 125; Hawk. b. 1, c. 73, s. 1.

MEMORY, TIME OF. According to the English common law, which has been altered by 2 & 3 Wm. IV., c. 71, the time of memory commenced from the reign of Richard the First, A. D. 1189. 2 Bl. Com. 31.
     2. But proof of a regular usage for twenty years, not explained or contradicted, is evidence upon which many public and private rights are held, and sufficient for a jury in finding the existence of an immemorial custom or prescription. 2 Saund. 175, a, d; Peake's Ev. 336; 2 Price's R. 450; 4 Price's R. 198.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter cells bind to MHC I on the antigen-presenting cells and destroy them, whereas the former contribute to immunological memory of the activation event.
One of the findings of her research that is especially encouraging is that immune-competent mice treated with both radiation and WP1066 developed an immunological memory that enabled them to prevent regrowth of the tumor after these tumor cells were reintroduced.
An adolescent booster dose, although not routinely recommended, merits consideration, as immunological memory against HBsAg is lost in a significant number of adolescents by the age of 15 years.
Development of immunological memory in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).
Both these and the B cells are made more potent by the adjuvant, stimulating helper T cells which are required for initiation of immune responses and the development of immunological memory for long-term immune protection.
This immunological memory explains the power of vaccines.
In this way, ITI's vaccines (DNA or RNA) have the potential to utilize the body's natural biochemistry to develop a broad immune response including antibody production, cytokine release and critical immunological memory.

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