impropriation


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See: appropriation, arrogation, assignment, assumption, condemnation, disseisin, distress, taking

IMPROPRIATION, eccl. law. The act, of employing the revenues of a church living to one's own use; it is also a parsonage or ecclesiastical living in the hands of a layman, or which descends by inheritance. Tech. Dict. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning with his work with the Feofees of Impropriations he maintained a strong desire to cooperate with his lay counterparts.
In 1630, rising star of the establishment and later biographer of Laud, Peter Heylyn, delivered a sermon at Oxford in which he denounced the Feoffees for Impropriations as an enclave of sedition.
First, in terms of practical effectiveness, Noy's claim that they had 'vast appetites to have all impropriations and advowsons that they can come by' appears specious.
(43) Thus we can see in the Feoffees for Impropriations an example of a localized network of association interacting with national/central concerns.
Furthermore, as with the Feoffees for Impropriations, in the political environment of the 1630s, where dissent has been silenced or driven underground, it is impressions which can often have the most impact.
This chapter continues with a brief biography of Bramhall and a description of his and Wentworth's efforts to restore impropriations and church property through high-profile prosecutions.
Although the lay farmer had experienced considerable difficulty in collecting these tithes in 1632, it is unlikely that the dean and chapter were particularly concerned about it.(89) They were, however, extremely careful to pre-empt any accusation that their improvement of the Common would disadvantage the vicar, especially since, under legislation of 1548, enclosed commons and reclaimed lands were exempt from tithes.(90) Indeed, they argued that their provision for Richard White under the terms of the 1636 agreement was consistent with the crown's criticism of `the manifold inconveniences which happen to the church and commonwealth by reason of impropriations and the small endowment of vicars and stipendiary priests'.
This is not how Laud saw things about ten years after this sermon was preached when he dissolved the Feoffees for Impropriations, a group including Richard Sibbes whose purpose was to buy up lay impropriations (the fights of lay people to appoint clergy to specific positions) with a view to appointing only ministers well qualified to preach.(23) Donne's views were shared by such non-Laudian bishops as Gervase Babington, who said, "a minister should not be dumbe, but heard ever in his church preaching and teaching the gospel of God: for woe be unto me, saith the blessed Apostle, if I preach not." Any regular reader can recognize that Pauline quotation as a recurrent refrain in Donne's Sermons.(24)
While she is still in the country, Elizabeth's house is "the Temple of Rapine, one of the prime Goddesses next the Cause; whither for sacrifices all manner of Cattel, clean and unclean, were brought from all the adjacent parts." (94) Such extortions are linked with offerings at the Hebrew temple at Jerusalem: "For not only was her Corban to be satisfied with the product of such oblations, but lands were to be set apart and sequestred, the revenue of which past first through her fingers, and were made Impropriations of her own." (95) Similarly, Elizabeth's kitchen is like the Canaanite "Temple of Bell [Baal] and the Dragon" where "all those offerings of Diet were consumed, or as good, altered and assimilated to her nature ...
There continued to be some central leadership, most notably in the secretive Feoffees for Impropriations. Hill saw this committee as a model for later political party organization.(26) But Tom Watson has recently revealed a more considerable clerical effort to keep the movement together, in his Godly Clergy in Early Stuart England: The Caroline Puritan Movement, c.
This is not how Laud saw things about ten years after this sermon was preached when he dissolved the Feoffees for Impropriations, a group including Richard Sibbes whose purpose was to buy up lay impropriations (the rights of lay people to appoint clergy to specific positions) with a view to appointing only ministers well qualified to preach.