Inculpate


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Inculpate

To accuse; to involve in blame or guilt.

When an individual who has committed a crime imputes guilt upon another individual, he or she is thereby inculpating such individual.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

TO INCULPATE. To accuse one of a crime or misdemeanor.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
it only seems fair that it be permitted to inculpate F in the case in
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It would inculpate anyone who fights a war, for example, no matter how good the cause, although no one, apart from the pacifist fringe, would have us simply disarm.
Some objects will inculpate the client with no need to prove the
The court noted that "no defendant undertook to inculpate another, each denied participation in the robbery[,]" and the codefendants' alibi defenses were "consistent" and "compatible." (557) On sua sponte severance, the Precup court distinguished Wheeler (1970), an anomalous case that never mentioned antagonism and is a extremely rare example of an appellate court finding error in the trial court's failure to sever defendants sua sponte, (558) and cited McCasle and Merritt (1973) in rejecting the appellants' argument.
Practice guidelines are double-edged swords, as they may be used in some jurisdictions either to exculpate or inculpate, i.e., exonerating or implicating the doctor.
In the sentient world we all occupy, however, there is no logical way to inculpate the sale of firearms or ammunition clips in the murders committed in Tucson.
This underlying presumption becomes more explicit as Lord Auld continues, stating, "' [Trial] is a search for truth in accordance with the twin principles that the prosecution must prove its case and that a defendant is not obliged to inculpate themselves." (233) No longer, in this victim-oriented system of criminal justice, must we envision an innocent man standing trial, facing imminent and unjust punishment.
Throughout the novel Oskar fantasizes about and even participates directly in a number of gruesome wrongdoings, but he spares no effort to inculpate himself and to be punished accordingly--telling his story is the most concrete manifestation of this.
Yet Hallyn's purpose is neither to inculpate Descartes as a libertine, nor to defend him from such accusations.
2009) (determining that the declarant's statements to a physician were nontestimonial because they were made for the purposes of medical treatment and not to inculpate defendant, but that statements to a social worker were testimonial because they were made after Child Protective Services had been contacted); United States v.
(22.) The dispute involves some sentences that appear in the German edition, but not in Keynes's manuscript; but these sentences do not seem to inculpate Keynes any further, except for the use of the phrase "pronounced national leadership [Fuhrung]" with a positive connotation.