Inferior courts

INFERIOR COURTS. By this term are understood all courts except the supreme courts. An inferior court is a court of limited jurisdiction, and it must appear on the face of its proceedings that it has jurisdiction, or its proceedings. will be void. 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 2529.

References in classic literature ?
The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.
Do you know that I am called Florian Barbedienne, actual lieutenant to monsieur the provost, and, moreover, commissioner, inquisitor, controller, and examiner, with equal power in provostship, bailiwick, preservation, and inferior court of judicature?
Applying himself in earlier manhood to the study of the law, and having a natural tendency towards office, he had attained, many years ago, to a judicial situation in some inferior court, which gave him for life the very desirable and imposing title of judge.
As to the judiciary, the framers wrote a very short piece in Article 3, which stated that there would be a Supreme Court and such inferior courts as the Congress might decide from time to time.
Constitution provides in Article III, Section 1 that "The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behavior," It does not give judges a term for life but only "during good Behavior.
Just as Section I provides that the federal judicial power "shall be vested (not may be vested)" in a supreme court and congressionally established inferior courts, Justice Story noted, it also provides that "[tlhe judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive, for their services, a compensation which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.
A section of the article now reads: "Since Article Il, Section 1 [of the Constitution] indicates that judicial power in addition to the Supreme Court's rests 'in such inferior courts as the Congress may .
1: The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.
Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution states, "The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour.
If allowed by the judicial conference, inferior courts may enact local rules as long as they do not affect any substantive rights or conflict with general law, or require payment of any cost or fee unless allowed by general law.
Hamilton's arguments ultimately carried the day, and life tenure was provided to judges of the "supreme and inferior Courts.
The relevant constitutional provision is Article III, Section I, which vests "the judicial power" in "one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as Congress from time to time may ordain and establish.