Infirmity


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Infirmity

Flaw, defect, or weakness.

In a legal sense, the term infirmity is used to mean any imperfection that renders a particular transaction void or incomplete. For example, if a deed drawn up to transfer ownership of land contains an erroneous description of it, an infirmity exists in the transaction.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although Murray ventures only briefly into what he calls the 'psychological dimension' of suicide, (4) it is through this space that we can begin to see how people in the medieval past portrayed emotional motivations and responses to suicide, especially by using infirmity to describe those who died by their own hand.
The section relating to illness and infirmity has remained closed under data protection rules, until now.
Moeller eventually contracted mesothelioma and, together with his wife, filed suit against Garlock, claiming exposure to its gaskets was the substantial factor for his infirmity. Moeller succumbed to the disease in 2008.
He lost a lot of weight and suffers weakness and severe infirmity," MENA quoted the head of the hospital where Mubarak is being treated as saying.
Age and infirmity affects most of us eventually, Mr Hemming.
Key findings show that 44 per cent of British homeowners between the ages of 35 and 54 expect to have to sell their home to fund the cost of either residential or home care in the event of infirmity.
This is because, through age and infirmity, many are unable to fight and protect their own rights.
The mean fraudster took advantage of his victim's infirmity to plunder cash from his bedroom.
Psalm 34,5 LORD, bless those whose work or age or infirmity makes them lonely; those who suffer by night as well as by day; those in sorrow, who find little to comfort.
The Boomer Burden offers guidance for any executor, heir, or beneficiary going through one of life's most overwhelming challenges: the infirmity and death of a parent.
However, most contracts have a medical infirmity clause, whereby if a performer is hospitalised no penalty needs to be paid, reports News.com.au.
CUT-PRICE leisure centre admission, which has been open to stable staff for 20 years, is being phased out, except for those most in need of the facility due to injury or infirmity, writes Howard Wright.