innominate

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innominate

‘having no name’, in Scots contract law, a contract that is both unusual and innominate, having no known name like sale or hire, for example. Now that there is no requirement for writing, the category may vanish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Petrarch's poems as contexts for "Monna Innominata," even
the triangulation of the monna innominata, Esther, and Petrarch portrays
In its vision of love as a desire that cannot be satisfied, Mother and Daughter parts company with Sonnets from the Portuguese, and unlike Monna Innominata it advocates accepting-rather than transcending-the disappointments of human love.
29) I am, of course, thinking of Barrett Browning's Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850), Meredith's Modern Love (1862), Dante Gabriel Rossetti's The House of Life (1870), Eliot's Brother and Sister (1874), and Christina Rossetti's Monna Innominata (1881).
We witness it not only in Goblin Market: it permeates her works, (4) prose as well as poetry, from the 1850s--one immediately thinks of her juvenile prose tale, Maude, as well as poems such as The Convent Threshold and "An Apple-Gathering," for instance--to her last major poems, including the justly admired Monna Innominata sonnet of sonnets.
We see this pattern of renouncing earthly passions, once experienced, in favor of religious devotion and fulfillment in works published later as well, such as the incomparable Monna Innominata sonnets, whose speaker tells her story of "love and parting in exceeding pain" (11.
19) Marjorie Stone takes issue with this claim, arguing that EBB's prior subversion of love sonnet conventions significantly influenced Rossetti's sequence; see "Monna Innominata and Sonnets from the Portuguese," in The Culture of Christina Rossetti: New Essays on Christina Rossetti, ed.
For instance: all sonnet-sequences consciously participate in a tradition; but I can think of no example except for Christina Rossetti's Monna Innominata that so strenuously displays its debts to precursors as to put a pair of epigraphs at the head of every sonnet, essentially disrupting the economy that defines the sonnet form.
In "A Woman of Women for 'A Sonnet of Sonnets': Exploring Female Subjectivity in Christina Rossetti's 'Monna Innominata,'" Sharon Bickle argues that Rossetti marked "a disjunction between the voice of the poet/translator and the Lady who speaks" (p.