prayer

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Prayer

The request contained in a bill in Equity that the court will grant the process, aid, or relief that the complainant desires.

In addition, the term prayer is applied to that segment of the bill that contains this request.

prayer

n. the specific request for judgment, relief and/or damages at the conclusion of a complaint or petition. A typical prayer would read: "The plaintiff prays for: 1) special damages in the sum of $17,500; 2) general damages according to proof [proved in trial]; 3) reasonable attorney's fees; 4) costs of suit; and 5) such other and further relief as the court shall deem proper." A prayer gives the judge an idea of what is sought, and may become the basis of a judgment if the defendant defaults (fails to file an answer). Sometimes a plaintiff will inflate damages in the prayer for publicity or intimidation purposes, or because the plaintiff believes that a gigantic demand will be a better starting point in negotiations. However, the ridiculous multi-million prayers in smaller cases make plaintiffs look foolish and unrealistic. (See: complaint, default judgment)

prayer

noun application, application for relief, call, claim, earnest entreaty, earnest request, entreaty, humble entreaty, imploratio, imploration, invocation, motion, petition, plea, precatio, request, request for relief, request for the aid of the court, solemn entreaty, supplication, urgent request, votum
Associated concepts: prayer for relief
See also: appeal, call, entreaty, petition, request

prayer

a request contained in a petition to a court for the relief sought by the petitioner.

PRAYER, chanc. pleadings. That part of a bill which asks for relief.
     2. The skill of the solicitor is to be exercised in framing this part of the bill. An accurate specification of the matters to be decreed in complicated cases, requires great discernment and experience; Coop. Eq. Pl. 13; it is varied as the case is made out, concluding always with a prayer of general relief, at the discretion of the court. Mitf. Pl. 45.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among the formula compositions Conen distinguishes two types: (1) formula-compositions proper: Mantra, Inori, Jubilaum, and In Freundschaft; and (2) process-compositions that employ formulas: "Laub und Regen" from Herbstmusik, Musik im Bauch, Harlekin, Der kleine Harlekin, and Sirius.
The magic cry of the bass, reacting to the witch-like "Muonen" of the sopranos, brings to mind the exclamation of the tone HU in Stockhausen's work Inori.
The superformula for Licht has much more content than the formulas of Mantra, Sirius, or Inori.
In the absence of a proper citation, Frisius's words might be taken to suggest that Schnebel is writing from a perspective of long estrangement from Stockhausen, and that he should have considered such later works as Trans, Inori, Tierkreis, or Licht, but in fact the passage in question is from "Nachwort 1971" (Schnebel 1972, 59-61), a text written for but ultimately not used (little wonder, considering the tone
Then with Intuitive Music (1965-1970), where the activities of the interpreter remain connected to some pitch polarities systematically organized starting from series (Stop 1965), even though writing will reassume its priority function again--in 1970, with Mantra--for different reasons (chiefly dissatisfaction, given the too-aleatoric quality of the results of experiments in unnotated music), and will carry on the experiment of the early years again (as early as 1974, in Inori, the principle of articulation of tempos goes back to that of Gruppen from 1957).
If we put forward our analysis of Inori (1973-74), a work for one or two soloists (mime-dancers) and orchestra, it is because we think to have avoided this double pitfall by highlighting the great readability of this work, the place which it occupies in Stockhausen's creative work, and also its relationship with the history of ideas.
Yet it is clear that in the years preceding that announcement, "music theater" of one sort or another had become a virtual obsession for Stockhausen, whether it was a matter of the orchestral piece Trans, with its string players seated on sharply raised daises behind a purple-lit gauze curtain, the rustic tumbling in the leaves in Herbstmusik, the praying mime in Inori, the ritual actions of the Indianerlieder (and indeed the whole of Alphabet f[ddot{u}]r Li[grave{e}]ge, of which they form a part), Musik im Bauch and Atmen gibt das Leben, or the astral visitations of Sirius.