Insider


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Insider

In the context of federal regulation of the purchase and sale of Securities, anyone who has knowledge of facts not available to the general public.

Insider information refers to knowledge about the financial status of a company that is obtained before the public obtains it, and which is usually known only by corporate officials or other insiders. The use of insider information in the purchase and sale of stock violates federal securities law.

Insider trading entails the purchase and sale of corporate shares by officers, directors, and stockholders who own more than 10 percent of the stock of a corporation listed on a national exchange (any association that provides facilities for the purchase and sale of securities, such as the New York Stock Exchange). Insider reports detailing such transactions must be submitted monthly to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

insider

n. someone who has a position in a business or stock brokerage, which allows him/her privy to confidential information (such as future changes in management, upcoming profit and loss reports, secret sales figures, and merger negotiations) which will affect the value of stocks or bonds. While there is nothing wrong with being an insider, use of the confidential information unavailable to the investing public in order to profit through sale or purchase of stocks or bonds is unethical and a crime under the Securities and Exchange Act. (See: insider trading)

See: bystander, member
References in periodicals archive ?
CNN reported this week that insider selling has reached its highest level since 2007, a potentially bearish signal that high-level executives see trouble ahead for stocks.
With Insider, Singapore Airlines can implement initiatives on-the-fly.
Catalyst believes that the Insider Buyout Proposal greatly undervalues the company across each of its real estate, retail and iconic brand attributes.
Tan, a businessman close to former president Joseph Estrada, was cleared of charges of stock manipulation and insider trading after the Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court decision declaring as inadmissible the government's evidence against him.
Insider buying is viewed as a bullish signal because insiders know their company's operations well and are privy to financial information.
Today, the DoD-directed definition of Insider Threat is: "A person with authorized access, who uses that access wittingly or unwittingly, to harm national security interests or national security through unauthorized disclosure, data modification, espionage, terrorism, or kinetic actions resulting in loss or degradation of information, resources, or capabilities.
'Our focus is on building a service that is beneficial to our clients so we are honoured to be selected from among the competition as an exclusive content partner for Vietnam Insider. We are confident that our clients' corporate news across the Asia Pacific region offers an interesting genre of news to the readers of Vietnam Insider.
This symposium will feature senior level discussions of the latest efforts by government agencies and organizations focused on this year's theme of "leveraging technology & developing procedures to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threats.
As a federally funded premier research and coordination center for cybersecurity issues, the CERT (Computer Emergency Response Teams) at the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University have recently provided an updated definition of the insider threat.
Governments need to train employees on how to recognize and report common behaviors associated with insider threats.
First, that a large portion of the general public shares the perception that insider trading is economically harmful and morally wrong.
(29.) See, e.g., Bainbridge, supra note 25 at 64-65 (arguing that although "remote tippees" can be liable for insider trading, "it often will be difficult to prosecute tipping chain cases, because of the potential difficulties inherent in proving the requisite knowledge on the part of remote tippees").