intendant

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Related to Intendants: League of Augsburg
See: administrator, director, procurator, superintendent

INTENDANT. One who has the charge, management, or direction of some office, department, or public business.

References in classic literature ?
These are your children, who were saved from death by the intendant of your gardens, and brought up by him as if they were his own.
Elle est evoque brievement la greve des intendants soulignant que son departement n'a pas encore recu une notification de la part du syndicat.
Intendants have included Heinz Tietjen, Siegfried Palm and Felsenstein protege Gotz Friedrich, whose work still casts a long shadow in the house.
In 1718 and again later in 1749, the monarchy adopted a system of government by intendants in Spain; later in the 1780s the system was integrated into South American colonial bureaucracy.
The incredibly litigious politics of Dijon gradually quieted down as avocats lost seats in the city government, and governors and intendants assumed greater powers.
In particular, the text explores the complexities authorities dealt with in deciding to use coercive force; Louis XIV's reliance on his standing army to maintain order within the kingdom; the significant difficulties encountered by intendants, governors and other local authorities as they tried to implement the Crown's coercive policies; and implications of this study for more familiar debates including the nature of French absolutism and the role of armed coercion in the process of 17th- century state formation.
En tant que geologues, nous disposons de la connaissance scientifique nous permettant d'etre des intendants efficaces de la planete Terre, et a ce titre, nous avons un role de premier plan a jouer dans le debat sur les changements climatiques.
Chapter two shows French governors and intendants engaging with Mauritius's (Ile de France) lack of self-sufficiency and the socio-economic and political contexts and results of their policies.
Their principal tasks were to defend the privileges of the Estates against incursions by intendants, or officials in Versailles, and to negotiate the loans needed to supplement what was raised in taxes.
5 million voters were required by law to go to the polls to elect intendants and Juntas Deparamentales, or 31-members departmental councils.
It was the very complexity of the architecture of the State which permitted a slow yet relentless unification of the noble class itself, which was gradually adapted into a new centralised mould, subject to public control of the intendants while still occupying privately owned positions within the officier system and local authority in the provincial parlements.