ceiling

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ceiling

noun acme, altitude, apex, apogee, climax, extreme, extremity, farthest point, height, highest degree, highest point, limit, maximum, optimum, peak, pinnacle, record, roof, summit, tectum, top, ultimate, utmost, uttost extent, utmost height, uttermost, vertex, zenith
Associated concepts: maximum income ceiling, maximum rent ceiling
References in periodicals archive ?
So interest rate ceilings on deposits probably had a limited effect on competition, since most of the time they were not binding.
Hence, ALRC is a constructed variable comprising the interest rate ceiling for the period up to June 1990 and unit value ([e.
33) Two factors gave impetus to the creation of MMMFs: the high inflation of the 1970s, which became embedded in market expectations, and the rise of market interest rates to levels much higher than those permitted by Regulation Q interest rate ceilings.
For an extended discussion of the distorting effects of interest rate ceilings on the financial system and the allocation of credit see Cargill [1991], pp.
The regulations governing personal loan markets that have been most frequently analyzed are interest rate ceilings and restrictions on the remedies available to creditors attempting to collect on delinquent or defaulted accounts.
Interest rate ceilings on commercial bank deposit services were imposed during the 1930s and regulated by the Federal Reserve System.
and global audiences on topics such as credit reporting, credit scoring, the impact of interest rate ceilings on credit availability, fair-lending regulations, credit counseling, college student credit card usage, and personal bankruptcy.
He said the government is designing "a series of measures" such as establishing a new credit fund to support the private sector, setting up a mechanism for partial credit insurance, removing interest rate ceilings in lending, and strengthening the function of the inter-bank market to improve the financial environment.
One likely area of convergence is the elimination of any remaining interest rate ceilings, although the primary factor in removal of such limitations may be the ongoing process of deregulation in this area, including the development of alternative financial instruments.
In addition, other concerns relating to possible politically motivated interference of the banking system, including but not limited to a distressed debt exchange by the government, directed lending, fees control, and interest rate ceilings, have diminished as these actions have either not taken place or done so in a watered-down form.