Miscegenation

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Miscegenation

Mixture of races. A term formerly applied to marriage between persons of different races. Statutes prohibiting marriage between persons of different races have been held to be invalid as contrary to the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

References in periodicals archive ?
Black women and white men in interracial relationships were interviewed between 2014 and 2017 to learn how they met and how their relationships progressed.
Therefore, given this unique historical context paired with the potential benefits of interracial relationships on student outcomes, this study seeks to better understand and establish the extent to which students are engaging in interracial relationships and to test whether the context of college plays a role in facilitating these interactions.
20, 2011, at A1 (discussing the increasing acceptance of interracial relationships in parts of the Deep South).
More importantly, none of the films features interracial relationships between African-American soldiers and white German women, although 3.000 out of the 68.000 'occupation children,' born to German mothers and fathered by American GIs during 1945 to 1949, were so-called 'Mischlinge' ('mixed bloods').
The data, which will be released soon, will suggest there are now more than one million people born to parents in interracial relationships.
As a result of the data analysis process, the following phenomena emerged from the individual perceptions and practices of selected middle school counselors: how student's race and/or ethnicities were identified, how interracial relationships were perceived, the specific needs of multiple heritage adolescents, and techniques used when working with multiple heritage adolescents.
Wanhalla further argues "New Zealand has a distinctive history of hybridity where male newcomers entered into interracial relationships, contributing to the development of a hybrid population that was welcomed and celebrated by officials and Aboriginal peoples, and that this history of intermixing is not as well known as the social worlds and societies created out of the North America fur trade."
to question heteronormativity, whether implicitly or explicitly, as the association of transgressive interracial relationships with queerness and homosexuality became a definitive feature of bohemian life, most noticeably in the Harlem Renaissance, but also in modernist texts such as Gertrude Stein's Melanctha.
While black men have long felt free to choose white mates, he notes, black women are "more segregated in the intimate marketplace than any group in American society: They view interracial relationships as too complicated and see partnering with black men as an expression of a larger commitment to the race itself; often, black women aren't as attracted to men of other races as they are to black men.
Section 3, devoted to cultural identity and ethnic relations, consider topics such as interracial relationships in English Colonial fiction, the novels of J.
Pascoe effectively demonstrates that laws governing interracial relationships served as mechanisms to determine and uphold notions of "difference." (2) Indeed, her discussion of the laws governing sexual relationships between white men and black women in the slave South underscores this point.