interrogation

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interrogation

n. questioning of a suspect or witness by law enforcement authorities. Once a person being questioned is arrested (is a "prime" suspect) he/she is entitled to be informed of his/her legal rights, and in no case may the interrogation violate rules of due process. (See: Miranda Warning)

interrogation

noun catechization, examination, exploration, formal questioning, grilling, inquest, inquiry, inquisition, inspection, investigation, percontatio, probe, quaestio, query, questioning, scrutiny, search, taking information
Associated concepts: grand jury inquiry, interrogation of a party to an action, interrogation of a witness
See also: cross-examination, examination, hearing, indagation, inquest, inquiry, investigation, question, test
References in periodicals archive ?
Sleep deprivation, water dousing, abdominal slaps, dietary manipulation--these were just some of the "enhanced interrogation techniques" mentioned in what's generally known as the 2014 Senate torture report.
I remember being almost unconscious during the long interrogations.
confessions, this article argues that custodial interrogations,
The Office of the Surgeon General ignored this unpleasant fact by defining "participation" as directly engaging in interrogations and denying medical personnel claims this was not an attempt to mislead but to deal with conflicting guidance.
The CIA's "brutal" program of so-called enhanced interrogation techniques, which the CIA still refuses to acknowledge as torture, was far harsher than the agency previously admitted or politicians and officials were told.
Details of harsh interrogation techniques used by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on suspected terrorists are due to be released today.
John McCain, who was himself tortured as a POW during Vietnam, said on the Senate floor Tuesday that the harsh interrogations described in the report amount to torture.
The prison conditions and harsh interrogations of detainees were more brutal than the CIA officials acknowledged to the American public and in contacts with Congress and the White House.
Americans long have been aware of the broad outlines of the program, including the transport of suspects for harsh interrogations to "black sites" abroad and the use of water-boarding and other interrogation techniques.
Lauritzen is critical of abusive interrogations and advocates respecting the moral autonomy of individuals.
Some advocates argue that such false confessions could be prevented if police interrogations were recorded.
However, one of the most important areas of the military police profession that cannot be allowed to suffer is the area of interrogations.