Irish law

Irish law

there are two legal systems in Ireland, both of which are common law systems. From the Irish Act of Union in 1800 until 1921, Ireland was ruled as part of the UK, although it had a separate court structure from which appeals could be brought to the House of Lords. With the partition of the island, two parliaments were set up, that of Northern Ireland, which comprised the six northeastern counties, being located at Stormont on the outskirts of Belfast, and that of the Irish Free State meeting in Dublin. New court systems were also created for the two parts of the island with (as is still the case) a final appeal from Northern Ireland to the House of Lords, and, in the case of the Irish Free State, an appeal to the Privy Council, although this was abolished in 1933. The Parliament of Northern Ireland had power to make laws for the ‘peace, order and good government of the province’ but could not legislate on certain matters, such as the armed forces, foreign affairs, weights and measures, and copyright, which were regarded as of national significance and reserved for Westminster. The Stormont Parliament was abolished in 1972, and from that time until 1999 Northern Ireland was subject to direct rule from Westminster. Since 1999 a Northern Ireland Assembly set up under the GOOD FRIDAY AGREEMENT has had powers devolved to it, albeit they have been suspended from time to time as a result of problems with the peace process.

The Irish Free State, which came into existence in 1922, had a status akin to that of dominions such as Australia and Canada, with a written constitution. This constitution was replaced in 1937 with the present one, which proclaimed the complete independence of Ireland (or, in the Irish language, Eire), which by the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 formally declared itself to be a republic. On independence, existing law continued to apply in the Irish Free State, and the 1937 Constitution also provided that existing law should continue in force insofar as it was not inconsistent with the Constitution. As a result it is not uncommon to find that legislation passed by the Westminster Parliament prior to independence applies in Ireland and that rules of law laid down by UK courts prior to independence are applied. Ireland is different from the UK in that its laws can be struck down by the Supreme Court if found to conflict with the Constitution in a similar way to other countries with formal constitutions such as the USA.

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To date, Irish law has been riddled with loopholes giving room for those that would make immoral cash.
As an avid campaigner to legalise brothels in the UK, Vivien said the Irish law criminalising those who pay for sex will only make matters worse.
The transaction involved a cross-collateralised structure and a set of finance and security documentation under English law, Irish Law, PRC law, and the laws of the Republic of Korea.
The seven-judge Supreme Court ruled that the man's second marriage was not recognized under Irish law, while the first marriage would be recognized, Irish media reported.
In two previous volumes, Irish law scholar and circuit judge Enright looked at the trials arising out of the martial law era in 1921, and at trials arising out of the 1916 Easter Rising.
She added: "There is a genuine commitment for the Irish law society and BLS to explore opportunities for working together.
Elan's acquisition will be effected by a "scheme of arrangement" under Irish law and, in connection with the acquisition, a subsidiary of New Perrigo will merge with and into Perrigo.
This acquisition will be effected by means of a scheme of arrangement under Irish law.
Victory for Ryanair: the Belgian employment tribunal in Charleroi decided, on 5 November, that a dispute between the Irish low-cost airline and six of its former employees is a matter for Irish law.
In all three cases, the Court noted insufficient clarity in Irish law, but was reluctant to affirm abortion as a substantive right.
According to Moody's Investment Services, investors who hold debt securities backed by home loans issued by Irish banks are likely to benefit from a new Irish law that has been designed to allow lenders to seize more properties.
The Irish Bishops' Conference condemned the legislation as "a dramatic and morally unacceptable change to Irish law.

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