Beth Din

(redirected from Jewish court)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Jewish court: Din Torah, Beis din

Beth Din

a Jewish court. The London Beth Din is the court of the Chief Rabbi. Aside from dealing with matters of Jewish law for Jewish people, it offers its services in dispute resolution to Gentiles. So far as Jewish matters are concerned, it has jurisdiction in respect of adoptions, circumcision, conversion to the faith, Kashrut (in relation to kosher food and Gittin) and Jewish divorces. See GET.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
[for] any alien practice that a Jewish court finds to be a capital crime.
When asked about Beth Din, the Jewish court that operates freely across the U.K., MacEoin said they only rule according to British law.
In May 2001 a Jewish court, the Kedassia Beth Din, investigated her claims of sexual harassment against Mr Maccaba, and the alleged million dollar offer, and found them 'not proven'.
The Jewish court system initially developed due to the Talmudic ban on Jews voluntarily presenting their cases to courts governed by idolatrous peoples, courts of Akkum.
David Menahem Shohet, The Jewish court in the Middle Ages: Studies in Jewish Jurisprudence According to the Talmud, Geonic and Medieval German Responsa (New York: Commanday-Roth Co., 1931).
But a Jewish court, a beit din, is different in fundamental ways from the court of a state like the United States or, for that matter, Israel.
The best she can do is ask her husband to cooperate with a Jewish court or rabbi to have the get written on his behalf and then handed over to her in front of witnesses.
Disputes would normally be ruled upon by a Jewish court, a Beth Din, without recourse to any outside authority or legal system.
Part I of this Comment discusses the applicability of substantive Jewish Law outside of a Jewish court. (8) Part II analyzes general issues of Jewish Law that conflict with the duties of a criminal defense lawyer.
However, if the defendant refuses to accept the authority of the religious court, the claimant, upon receiving permission from the Jewish court, may bring his claim against the defendant in the non-Jewish court in order "to prevent the strong and powerful from evading the law." (99) This rule was applied by most contemporary authorities to permit the initiation of a lawsuit in the Israeli secular court system.
We must conclude from this evidence that Jesus was not tried by a legally established Jewish court....
To resolve this, he said, the Sages came up with a formula called a heter iska, essentially a contract where a Jewish court of law becomes the administrator of a loan and charges a fee for its use.

Full browser ?