ransom

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ransom

1) n. money paid to a kidnapper in demand for the release of the person abducted. Ransom money can also be paid to return a valuable object such as a stolen painting. 2) v. to pay money to an abductor to return the person held captive. (See: kidnapping, abduction)

ransom

noun cost of reclamation, cost of recovery, deliverance, extrication, pretium, price of redemption, price of retaking, price of retrieval, redemption, rescue
See also: blackmail, extricate, free, pay, redeem, rescue

RANSOM, contracts, war. An agreement made between the commander of a capturing vessel with the commander of a vanquished vessel, at sea, by which the former permits the latter to depart with his vessel, and gives him a safe conduct, in consideration of a sum of money, which the commander of the vanquished vessel, in his own name, and in the name of the owners of his vessel and cargo, promises to pay at a future time named, to the other.
     2. This contract is usually made in writing in duplicate, one of which is kept by the vanquished vessel which is its safe conduct; and the other by the conquering vessel, which is properly called ransom bill.
     3. This contract, when made in good faith, and not locally prohibited, is valid, and may be enforced. Such contracts have never been prohibited in this country. 1 Kent, Com. 105. In England they are generally forbidden. Chit. Law of Nat. 90 91; Poth. Tr. du Dr. de Propr. n. 127. Vide 2 Bro. Civ. Law, 260; Wesk. 435; 7 Com. Dig. 201; Marsh. Ins. 431; 2 Dall. 15; 15 John. 6; 3 Burr. 1734. The money paid for the redemption of such property is also called the ransom.

References in periodicals archive ?
21) John Crowe Ransom, The New Criticism (Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1941), 275.
On the surface John Crowe Ransom and Allen Tate may appear less preternatural than Emerson, with their movement aligned more predictably with Christian orthodoxy.
After all, he had his poems by heart, just as did John Crowe Ransom, back in his study in a constant worry over getting it right and trying to hack his way through another sonnet that kept growing on him, despite all attempts at controlling the creative impulse, that part that would not wither and fade and die, no matter the state of the vehicle temporarily housing it.
Gentleman in a Dustcoat: A Biography of John Crowe Ransom Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.
Empson's model also affords a way of considering the irony in the so-called minor verse of John Crowe Ransom such as "Bells for John Whiteside's daughter", "Winter remembered", "Vaunting oak", "Eclogue", and "Janet waking" (all poems published in the 1920s).
These included a number recruited after the war by John Crowe Ransom, the founder of the prestigious Kenyon Review.
More tragic were George Santayana and John Crowe Ransom, who loved the old myths almost as much as the evangelicals, but simply could not believe them anymore.
On the question of quite how life and art can and do always, inevitably touch, one might invoke the term 'contingency', noted by the English poet Geoffrey Hill as 'a constant ingredient in [the] verbal stock' of the Agrarian poet and author of The New Criticism, John Crowe Ransom.
Intellectual Luddites dedicated to the preservation of what they viewed as the traditional, rural-agrarian culture of the South, the group numbered among its more famous members Allan Tate, Donald Davidson, Robert Penn Warren and John Crowe Ransom.
At the age of 13, the young Hazlitt, living in Wem, wrote to the Shrewsbury Chronicle in protest at the beginning, by a church-and-king mob, of Joseph Priestley's house and laboratory and the Unitarian Chapel in Birmingham, describing Priestley as "one o f the best, one of the wisest, and one of the greatest of men" - illustrating even at that young age a musicality of prose that is kin to the works o say, Allen Ginsberg or John Crowe Ransom.
In time Davidson's fellow Fugitives--Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, and John Crowe Ransom among them--altered their views, but Davidson, who taught for many years at Vanderbilt, remained passionately devoted to his early ideals.
The Vanderbilt Agrarians," intellectual historian Richard King has written, "offered the closest thing to an authentic conservative vision which America has seen," and certainly John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, and their colleagues stand in a tradition of anti-industrial, anti-modern thought far better represented in England and on the Continent (and latterly in the Third World) than in the United States, a tradition today's students will find almost totally unfamiliar.