Jus Cogens

Jus Cogens

That body of peremptory principles or norms from which no derogation is permitted; those norms recognized by the international community as a whole as being fundamental to the maintenance of an international legal order.

Elementary rules that concern the safeguarding of peace and notably those that prohibit recourse to force or the threat of force. Norms of a humanitarian nature are included, such as prohibitions against Genocide, Slavery, and racial discrimination.

Jus cogens may, therefore, operate to invalidate a treaty or agreement between states to the extent of the inconsistency with any such principles or norms.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to him a State loses its immunity in two ways: a State is said to waive its entitlement to immunity when it commits a jus cogens violation and/or a State conduct that violates jus cogens norm is said to fall outside the category of protected State conduct, acta jure imperri26.Such conduct is devoid of legitimacy because it is in conflict with the will of international community.
According to Santiago, international environmental law that provides that you pay for your damage to the environment, whether done accidentally or not, is "jus cogens," meaning a peremptory rule of international law.
(4) The Supreme Court opined, however, that a suit against a foreign official "may still be barred by foreign sovereign immunity under the common law." (5) The Supreme Court's holding in Samantar left it to the lower courts to decide how foreign official immunity should be treated under the "common law." (6) On remand, the Fourth Circuit concluded that foreign officials "are not entitled to foreign official immunity for jus cogens violations [of international law]," (7) which include atrocities such as genocide, (8) torture, and extrajudicial killing.
Part III then provides examples of practice in the area of jus cogens norms, customary law, and treaty law where it appears moral obligation is driving the understanding of law among human rights actors.
Part IV explores Miller's wholesale omission of international law and opinion, arguing that the Court could have (and perhaps should have) relied upon an emerging jus cogens norm against juvenile LWOP to strike down all such sentences.
The foreign minister in a tweet said protection from torture was a 'jus cogens' (compelling law) international norm, prohibited in absolute terms by Convention Against Torture, Common Article 3 of Geneva Conventions and customary international humanitarian law.
Peremptory Norms of General International Law (Jus Cogens) and the Prohibition of Terrorism
Likewise, many other diplomats, academics and activists around the globe have joined forces to voice their concerns over the adverse impacts, with catastrophic and unintended consequences, of sanctions on the general populations of the targeted countries, urging that human rights and jus cogens (peremptory norms) be given full consideration and act as limitations on the scope and duration of sanctions.
In particular, special attention was paid to such issues on the agenda as jus cogens (peremptory norms of the IL), identification of norms of international custom, immunity of state officials from foreign criminal jurisdiction, temporary application of treaties, subsequent agreements and practice with regard to interpretation of treaties and others.
Speaking of fundamental rules of international law, we can list three categories considered as jus cogens, specifically prohibition of the threat or use of force under UN Charter, fundamental human rights, and international humanitarian law, as confirmed in Article 50 of ILC Articles on State Responsibility.
Second, and more importantly for our purposes, judicial capacity refers to a national judiciary's authority and ability to enforce effectively the law and legal norms that actually exists in international law, either in written form or in customary law, especially jus cogens norms.
He clearly demonstrated that customary human rights as rights based in the United Nations Charter have primacy in any social context, adding that some of those customary rights have assumed the status of peremptory norms (jus cogens) and some treaty-based human rights are nonderogable.