genitor

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genitor

the biological father as distinguished from the legal father.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
1999d 'Does pupu Mean 'cousin'?: Hyponymy and Collaterality in Brunei Malay Kinship Terminology.' Paper presented at the Fakulti Sastera dan Sains Kemasyarakatan (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences), Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD), Gadong, Brunei Darussalam, Oct.
While there is no doubt that for many urban and educated Nepali-speakers, English is the dominant status language, I suggest that prestige alone is not enough to explain borrowings of kinship terminology from English.
The Choctaws who moved west of the Mississippi changed their system of government and subsequently their kinship terminology to emphasize male control.
We show, however, using searches in Austkin 1 (kinship terminology) and Austkin 2 (social categories or 'skins'), that this is not the case.
The AustKin project is bringing together anthropology, linguistics and history to look at the kinship terminology of Australia.
Drawing on Kroeber's (1909) analysis of kinship terminology with reference to eight categories (generation, lineal versus collateral, age difference in one generation, sex of the relative, sex of the connecting relative, sex of the speaker, consanguinal versus affinal, and condition of the connecting relative), which later became the bases for componential analysis, Greenberg (1990[1980], 1966:72-87) attempts to apply the concept of markedness to the analysis of universal aspects of terminologies.
In recent times, therefore, the tabular method (4) has in many cases replaced the tree metaphor in the domain of kinship terminology. What Bouquet seems to misunderstand is that kinship as an anthropological concept reflects emic social categories (and rules), while genealogies reproduce an extract of social history in ways and forms that are--and one must concede her this point--largely reflected in the Euro-American iconography and ideology.
The kinship terminology of Buin (Figure 3) was first reported by R.
THE OENPELLI KUNWINJKU KINSHIP TERMINOLOGY AND MARRIAGE PRACTICES.
Contemporary Mundugumor no longer remember `ropes', and many of them do not even know the indigenous kinship terminology, having used Melanesian Pidgin kin terms all their lives.