cycle

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cycle

noun age, alternation, circle, circuit, consecution, course, eon, epoch, era, flow, period, recurrence, recurring period, regular return, regglarity of recurrence, repetitiveness, revolution, rotation, round, sequence, succession
See also: annum, frequency, life, sequence, succession
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Frequency of Increased * Urinary Excretion of Krebs Cycle Metabolites In Chronic Inflammatory Disorders Krebs Cycle Metabolites 2004 n = 236 2015 n = 315 Citric acid 194 315 Succinic acid 40 55 Aconitic acid 24 45 Fumaric acid 2 2 2-oxo-glutaric acid 1 2 * Levels of Krebs metabolites measured in mmol/mol creatinine.
The increase in these enzyme activities could be helpful to the fish in that the structural reorganization of proteins and incorporation of keto acids into the Krebs cycle serves to favour gluconeogenesis or energy production.
Glycolysis and the Krebs cycle produce the electrons, and the ETC moves electrons to power the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).
Pyruvate, which can readily penetrate the mitochondria membrane, enters into the Krebs cycle, as shown in Figure 10-7, the second phase of aerobic respiration named after the Noble Prize winner Sir Hans Krebs.
Acetyl-CoA may be utilized partly through the Krebs Cycle (Figure 2).
Mitochondria are the main source of energy production in the form of ATP via the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain in mammalian cells.
Any scientist will tell you he was the great man who developed the Krebs Cycle on which much of modern biological theory depends.
For example, the Krebs cycle did not evolve originally to feed NADH to the electron transport chain; it was co-opted for that purpose with the accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere.
Dichloroacetate, which increases flux into the Krebs cycle, as well as in termediates of the Krebs cycle, such as acetate and citrate, also enhanced the levels of PPSS I mRNA.
This citric acid cycle is often called the Krebs cycle in honor of its discoverer, and for this work, Krebs was awarded a share of the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine in 1953.
Hans Adolf Krebs of Sheffield University in England for his discovery of the citric acid cycle, known as the Krebs cycle.