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Law and literature, in all its diverse and perhaps inconsistent strands, is no exception.
For a somewhat idiosyncratic but very thorough account of the movement's history, see Michael Pantazakos, Ad Humanitatem Pertinent: A Personal Reflection on the History and Purpose of the Law and Literature Movement, 7 CARDOZO STUD.
1 (1994); Symposium, Law and Literature, 39 MERCER L.
In addition to the works of James Boyd White cited supra note 4, see, for example, IAN WARD, LAW AND LITERATURE: POSSIBILITIES AND PERSPECTIVES (1995); RICHARD WEISBERG, POETHICS AND OTHER STRATEGIES OF LAW AND LITERATURE (1992); and ROBIN WEST, NARRATIVE, AUTHORITY, AND LAW (1993).
1) Assuming that both law and literature must work via the indeterminate nature of language, many literary and some legal scholars have for at least a decade been turning to literary theory for analytical tools that, in sum, bring to the surface of legal argumentation the inherently "literary" moment of the law and expose the various rhetorical strategies by which the law represses its figural fluidity in its attempt to appear objectively fixed.
In fact, the current debate over the crossing of law and literature is an instance of what I mean: if the figurality of language marks the parameters of the conversation between the two disciplines of law and literature, then consequently, the "literary" can be said to have set the rules or given the "law" to this particular exchange.
Yet the relationship between law and literature is more fraught than Sanders's characterisation suggests.
There are three main strands of law and literature scholarship.
An established field of interdisciplinary study in the United States, law and literature has received scant attention from postcolonial literary critics.
Since most law and literature work is undertaken under the rubric of law in literature, I devote Section Two of this introduction to a prolegomenous look at selected works of apartheid and post-apartheid literature to explore some of the possibilities for this kind of scholarship that such works afford.
The first movement, law and literature, focuses on the analysis and criticism of literary works that have legal themes, portray lawyers, or depict legal practice.
Buffalo, NY) has published International Guide to Law and Literature Studies, a two-volume set that is targeted to researchers seeking secondary works in the area of law and literature studies between 1900 and 1995.