tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
In The Common Law, Holmes expressed the new orthodoxy, almost certainly without being aware that he was saying anything new: "The business of the law of torts is to fix the dividing lines between those cases in which a man is liable for harm which he has done, and those in which he is not."(42) Nobody either had or could have said that before the nineteenth century.
(1) This observation is particularly apt in the law of torts, where accessory liability has for the most part received haphazard attention in an eclectic range of cases, and has only recently been subjected to sustained critical analysis.
(78) The phrase appears to have been William Prosser's: see Richard V Campbell, Book Review of Handbook of the Law of Torts by William Prosser, (1941) 26:1 Minn L Rev 137 at 138.
law of tort provides clear and well-settled rules on which [a] district
Around fifty years ago, Vilhelm Lundstedt--a Swedish jurist who was a leading proponent of Scandinavian Legal Realism--in the course of a critique of American realist theories of the law of tort pointed out that Anglo-American writers rarely asked the question of why the state was at all involved in tort law.
But after the Second World War a number of other emigres played an important role in changing the nature of private law scholarship, in particular the scholarship of the law of tort.
Restatement of the Law of Torts, or in a torts treatise.
If the law of torts also included the sphere of pure economic losses, that is to say -- impose a duty of reasonable care on parties to look out for the economic interests of others, the purpose of contract law would largely disappear.
Another difficult case arose in the context of the civil law, and, in particular, in relation to the civil law of tort (which has to do with civil wrongs) and to what has been called the parens patriae jurisdiction of the superior courts (which has to do with children).
Towards a Public Law of Tort by Tom Cornford (Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2008) ISBN 978 0 7546 4683 9.