tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
And so when I came to read Some Thoughts on Risk Distribution and the Law of Torts and saw the footnote about reciprocity of causation, I thought of a favorite story from Guido's deanship.
(127) The enthusiasm for this approach is evident in the calendar of CUC for 1957 where the text is incorrectly named 'The Law of Torts in Australia'.
(123.) 1 FRANCIS HILLIARD, THE LAW OF TORTS OR PRIVATE WRONGS 84
hypothesis that the common law of torts is best explained as if the
DOBBS, THE LAW OF TORTS [section] 8, at 12 (2000) (describing tort liability as premised on deviation from acceptable standards); KEETON ET AL., supra note 5, [section] 1, at 6 (same).
Justice Linden, who has authored the Canadian equivalent of Prosser on Torts, shares Tom's joy about the law of torts. (28) Professor Lambert frequently gave guest lectures in Justice Linden's classes.
At least, Kull's approach is inconsistent with one that separates torts from unjust enrichment by saying that the law of torts is about wrongs, while the law of unjust enrichment does not depend upon wrongdoing.
It is sometimes said that the law of torts protects persons and property as a result of the particular values or priorities that a society happens to have, so that it might instead protect other things, or decline to protect property, or protect other interests that people have.
(17) Certainly Professor Fleming James' many articles and his multi-volume book, written with Fowler Harper, The Law of Torts (1956) was a heroic contribution, giving much credibility to the enterprise liability theory.
Noriko Kawawa, Comparative Studies on the Law of Tort Relating to Liability for Injury Caused by Information in Traditional and in Electronic Form: England and the United States, 12 ALBANY L.J.
Sandler (New York Law School) introduces the law of torts by defining terms; explaining how to organize facts into a legal theory, identify and analyze legal issues; and providing guidance on taking a torts test.