layman

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layman

noun amateur, civilian, laic, nonprofessional, nonspecialist, one who has no specialized training, unnkilled practitioner, untrained person
Associated concepts: lay witness
See also: amateur

LAYMAN, eccl. law. One who is not an ecclesiastic nor a clergyman.

References in periodicals archive ?
Norman Brennan, director of the Victims of Crime Trust, says, "The law does not need changing, it just needs to be explained in layman's terms to the public about what reasonable force they can use to protect themselves, their families and their homes.
Put simply, there is a counter-productive phenomenon that plagues the relationship between the corporate finance and IT departments, and its name is culpable deniability--or, in layman's terms, "that's not my job.
In layman's terms, ships that call on non-certified terminals become "contaminated" and may not be allowed to dock at certified ports afterwards.
The other articles described, in layman's terms, an audit, a compilation and a review and how these services relate to small- and mid-sized businesses.
Using eight different categories to classify a child's aptitude, You're Smarter Than You Think: A Kid's Guide to Multiple Intelligences by Thomas Armstrong, breaks it down in layman's terms what it means to be smart and it's more than just a score on an IQ test.
In talking to a board member, for example, the CIO has to be able to translate technical language into Layman's terms without sounding condescending or arrogant.
Tribble looks like, but I can attest that his Guide to Space is indeed a thorough explanation of basic concepts about the physical properties of space, offered up in layman's terms.
Illnesses and treatment are explained in layman's terms.
Restated in layman's terms, this principle means that you cannot observe something without changing it.
Systems infrastructure vulnerability and penetrations, as well as countermeasures to them, are discussed in layman's terms for ease of understanding.
Fifty-eight percent of reporters seek a spokesperson who "will bring the topic to the consumer level," or communicate issues in layman's terms.
Ogren explains in layman's terms what botanical basics, such as size, shape, colon fragrance and sex, turn a garden from a place of peace into a war zone for itchy eyes.