artery

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Related to Left common carotid artery: brachiocephalic artery, Left subclavian artery
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8 Although fusiform enlargement of the mediastinal segment of the left common carotid artery can occur in atherosclerotic disease and in some types of aortitis but a saccular pseudoaneurysm in this location has been recorded only in a few instances after major blunt chest trauma.
Saccular Aneurysm of the Proximal Left Common Carotid Artery.
Right sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery can be explained on the basis of regression in left arch involving dorsal segment between left common carotid artery and left subclavian arteries with regression of right ductus arteriosus.
Only eight cases of isolated left common carotid artery have been documented in the literature [2-8] till now.
Compared with the above mentioned literatures, in the present study, from three cadavers, it originated from arch of aorta in between the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery and in two cadavers it passed through transverse foramen of C5 vertebra.
The left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, and the brachiocephalic trunk were found at T3, T4, and T5 in 27.
The great vessels in mediastinum include the ascending, the descending, and the arch of aorta, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, brachiocephalic trunk, and superior vena cava (SVC).
Left vertebral artery, originated directly from arch of aorta between the left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery in one cadaver.
In approximately 80% of individuals, three branches arise from the aortic arch: the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery.
Carotico subclavian bypass grafting surgery was performed with 8 mm ringed polytetrafloroetilene (PTFE) graft between left subclavian artery and left common carotid artery after left subclavian incision under general anaesthesia (figure 3).