Legal Cause


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Related to Legal Cause: Proximate cause, but for

Legal Cause

In the law of torts, conduct that is a substantial factor in bringing about harm, which is synonymous with proximate cause.

References in periodicals archive ?
415.6 Legal Cause--Retaliation ("Protected activity is the legal cause ...
(30) The Restatement (First) of Torts embraced an idea of legal cause that included concepts from factual cause and proximate case analysis, while the Restatement (Third) of Torts separates factual and proximate cause.
Garcia] which was a legal cause of loss, injury, or damage to Daniel Duss?" in the negative.
Do investors have legal cause to seek compensation for damages caused by Wall Street firms?
For example, though the letter of Article 37 states that the employer may terminate an indefinite term contract upon giving the employee at least 30 daysAAE prior notice (unless the contract specifies a longer period), the reality of practice is that an employer must have a valid legal cause to terminate an employee and must have communicated this cause to the employee in the letter of termination.
Chapters are presented on intentional torts, negligence, proving breach, legal cause, limits on liability, defenses, apportionment of damages, professionals, owners and occupiers of land, special duty rules, damages, traditional strict liability, products liability, trespass and nuisance, defamation, and alternatives to litigation.
Al Ain A leading Islamic bank has been ordered by a court to pay a building materials company Dh9.854 million that the bank had deducted from the company's account without legal cause.
We have only joined JK Rowling, now Mrs Murray, to our lawsuit against Bloomsbury after discovering legal cause of action against her within the last six years."
Those sent to the frontline have every right to expect they go there, not only with the best possible equipment and planning, but also in a just and legal cause.
A legal cause celebre includes a prosecution over one of Britain's earliest gay contact ads which ran in IT.
One Court of Appeals has stated: "A plaintiff proves proximate cause, also referred to as legal cause, by demonstrating a natural and continuous sequence of events stemming from the defendant's act or omission, unbroken by any efficient intervening cause, that produces an injury, in whole or in part, and without which the injury would not have occurred" (Barrett v.