mediation

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Mediation

A settlement of a dispute or controversy by setting up an independent person between two contending parties in order to aid them in the settlement of their disagreement.

In International Law, mediation is the friendly interference of one state in the controversies of nations. It is recognized as a proper action to promote peace among nations.

The individual who intervenes in order to help the other parties settle their dispute is called a mediator.

Cross-references

Alternative Dispute Resolution.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mediation

n. the attempt to settle a legal dispute through active participation of a third party (mediator) who works to find points of agreement and make those in conflict agree on a fair result. Mediation differs from arbitration in which the third party (arbitrator) acts much like a judge but in an out-of-court less formal setting but does not actively participate in the discussion. Mediation has become very common in trying to resolve domestic relations disputes (divorce, child custody, visitation), and is often ordered by the judge in such cases. Mediation also has become more frequent in contract and civil damage cases. There are professional mediators, or lawyers who do some mediation for substantial fees, but the financial cost is less than fighting the matter out in court and may achieve early settlement and an end to anxiety. However, mediation does not always result in a settlement. (See: arbitration)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

mediation

a form of alternative dispute resolution, whereby parties attempt to resolve their differences without going to court. Some court systems utilize voluntary or compulsory mediation, especially in family matters. Mediators are trained in the necessary skills and some are lawyers and some are not. Often the result of a mediation will be encapsulated in legal form to prevent the deal being unstitched. It is used in disputes as varied as child custody and international disputes.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

MEDIATION. The act of some mutual friend of two contending parties, who brings them to agree, compromise or settle their disputes. Vattel, Droit des Gens, liv. 2, eh. 18, Sec. 328.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.