lex loci contractus


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lex loci contractus

in private international law, ‘the law of the place of the contract’.

LEX LOCI CONTRACTUS, contracts. The law of the place where an agreement is made.
     2. Generally, the validity of a contract is to be decided by the law of the place where, the contract is made; if valid, there it is, in general, valid everywhere. Story, Confl. of Laws, Sec. 242, and the cases there cited. And vice versa if void or illegal there, it is generally void everywhere. Id Sec. 243; 2 Kent Com. 457; 4 M. R. 584; 7 M. R. 213; 11 M. R. 730; 12 M. R. 475; 1 N. S. 202; 5 N. S. 585; 6 N. S. 76; 6 L. R. 676; 6 N. S. 631; 4 Blackf. R. 89.
     3. There is an exception to the rule as to the universal validity of contracts. The comity of nations, by virtue of which such contracts derive their force in foreign countries, cannot prevail in cases where it violates the law of our own country, the law of nature, or the law of God. 2 Barn. & Cresw. 448, 471. And a further exception may be mentioned, namely, that no nation will regard or enforce the revenue laws of another country. Cas. Temp. 85, 89, 194.
     4. When the contract is entered into in one place, to be executed in another, there are two loci contractus; the locus celebrate contractus, and the locus solutionis; the former governs in everything which relates to the mode of construing the contract, the meaning to be attached to the expressions, and the nature and validity of the engagement; but the latter governs the performance of the agreement. 8 N. S. 34. Vide 15 Serg. & Rawle 84; 2 Mass. R. 88; 1 Nott & M'Cord, 173; 2 Harr. & Johns. 193, 221; 2 N. H. Rep. 42; 5 Id. 401; 2 John. Cas. 355; 5 Pardes. n. 1482; Bac. Abr. Bail in Civil Causes, B 5; Com. Dig. 545, n.; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 270; 8 Ves. 198; 5 Ves. 750.

References in periodicals archive ?
13) the Tenth Circuit explained that under Kansas law, "[w]hen the question raised by the contractual dispute goes to the substance of the obligation, Kansas courts apply the primary rule contained in section 332, lex loci contractus, which calls for the application of the law of the state where the contract is made.
Although Kansas generally applies the lex loci contractus choice of law test, which looks to the place of contracting, the supreme court held that an exception to the rule exists "where the contract contravenes the settled public policy of the state whose tribunal is invoked to enforce the contract.
Even though many states still apply the lex loci contractus rule or look to the "place of contracting" to resolve choice of law questions, the majority of states apply more fact-based tests, placing different weight on different factors depending upon the underlying facts, and then consider the factors in light of the interests of the states at issue.
At around the same time that the rule of lex loci delicti was eroding in torts cases, the rule of lex loci contractus (22)--dealing with contracts cases--was undergoing similar changes.
supra note 4, at 74-78 ("[B]y the end of 2003, a total of 41 jurisdictions had abandoned the lex loci contractus rule, while eleven continued to adhere to it.
It seems clear, therefore, on principle, that, whether a legally binding contract has been made can be judged only by the lex loci contractus.
Esto explica la existencia de diversos intentos unificadores desde finales del siglo XIX hasta hoy, encaminados a lograr el equilibrio entre la soberania de cada Estado para regular el regimen matrimonial (los aspectos sustantivos del matrimonio: elementos esenciales y otros requisitos de validez) y el principio de seguridad juridica (para que el matrimonio celebrado segun la lex loci contractus sea reconocido por los demas Estados, salvo que sea contrario a su propio orden publico matrimonial o haya sido contraido en fraude de ley).
follows the lex loci contractus rule for choice-of-law); see also Chazen
2004) (asserting that lex loci contractus means that a
that lex loci contractus means the law of the place where the contract
example of a court applying traditional lex loci contractus principles
Conflict rules like lex loci contractus or lex loci executionis are subsidiary in the sense that they apply in the absence of lex voluntatis.