life imprisonment

(redirected from Life term)
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Related to Life term: life sentence

life imprisonment

a sentence of incarceration for a lengthy time. In some states ‘life’ may mean ‘whole life.’ Mostly there are provisions for a minimum term or for parole or for pardon or some combination. In the UK the sentencing judge will specify the time to be served without parole and there have been some ‘whole life’ cases. If released on parole the prisoner is on licence and maybe recalled to serve the rest of the sentence if there is further offending.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Britain it is not unusual for a judge to impose a life term and stipulate that the murderer complete a tariff of up to 40 years.
The court gave its decision after the Election Commission asked the judicial body that there should be a life term ban on convicted parliamentarians and MLAs from contesting elections.
Of these, four were sentenced to death and three to life terms.
I asked the Court of Appeal to look again at McLoughlin's original sentence because I did not think the ECHR had said anything which prevented our courts from handing down whole life terms in the most serious cases.
The Central Bureau of Investigation probed the case, and Lakshmana was handed life term.
In 1995, Cain was given a second life term after he and another inmate were convicted of murdering child killer Leslie Bailey - who was known as "Catweazle" - at Whitemoor prison near March, Cambridgeshire, in 1993.
Mittal reduced Mohd Naushad's death penalty to life term, while acquitting Mirza Nissar Hussain and Mohd Ali Bhat alias Kille.
Sweeney is already serving four life terms imposed in 2002 for the attempted murder in 1994 of Miss Balmer and having four guns when he was arrested while on the run.
Sutcliffe, pictured, now 64, received 20 life terms for the murder of 13 women and the attempted murder of others in Yorkshire and Greater Manchester.
Haller is an expert manipulator of events and is well on his way to the complete exoneration of Roulet when he discovers a link to a former client, Jesus Menendez, now serving a life term for murder.
Paul Worsley QC, for the Crown, opposing the application, said there were some rare cases, of which Hobson's was one, where the facts were so awful and serious that a 'whole life term should mean a whole life term'.
The large gap between the death penalty and life term has apparently arisen from such factors as a longer life span, compared with the time when the original Penal Code was put into effect more than 90 years ago.