lineage

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lineage

noun ancestors, ancestry, antecedents, blood relatives, bloodline, clan, descent, extraction, family, folk, forebears, forefathers, genealogy, gens, genus, line, line of descent, origin, origo, parentage, stirps
See also: affiliation, affinity, ancestry, blood, bloodline, children, derivation, descendant, family, filiation, heritage, house, issue, kindred, origin, parentage, paternity, posterity, progeny, relationship, source, succession

LINEAGE. Properly speaking lineage is the relationship of persons in a direct line; as the grandfather, the father, the son, the grandson, &c.

References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers have identified the role of key gene Mesp1 in the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation.
In this analysis, we compared lineages IIa and IIb and the group of clinically rare lineages separately with lineage Ib, which served as the reference (most common) lineage.
The six chapters of the book take pains to trace the rise of the lineage and especially the difficulties it encountered along its march to domination.
Although Cole does not argue for or against the historicity of Faru himself, he does argue that Faru's biography was a conscious creation, which drew on pre-existing lineages in order to allow Shaolin monastery to co-opt the authenticity of this extra-textual transmission.
Emperor and ancestor; state and lineage in South China.
This includes, but is nor limited to, the study of general mechanisms of pattern formation and cell lineage, neural crest development, cell specification, differentiation, migration, and fate in early development of many organs/systems such as limb, nervous system, immune system, and heart.
Lineages and genealogies entered Fujian with Han Chinese migrants in the tenth century.
The analysis of embryonic cell lineages in dicyemids is intriguing, since it may provide clues towards an understanding of the simplest patterns of cell differentiation in multicellular animals.
The current population of wolves originated from three independent captive lineages with each having only two or three founders captured during the 1960s and 1970s from northern Mexico and southern Arizona.
Data were collected on 15 lineages derived from an ancestral Tribolium castaneum cSM + / + stock population.
The subdivision of his 417 lineages into three status groups is questionable, in that in a significant number of cases the appearance of the same name in the three catasti reflects the persistence of a nuclear family over time -- with the frequent recurrence of a single name -- rather than proliferating branches of a clan, which for Molho defines the importance of a lineage.
For example, for the first time scientists will be able to determine when particular hESCs in culture have differentiated into mesoderm, endoderm or ectoderm lineages or remain undifferentiated, without having to kill the cells to analyze them.