lie

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lie

noun calumny, deceit, deception, distortion, false statement, falsehood, falsification, falsity, fiction, fraud, intentional distortion, intentional exaggeration, intentional misstatement, intentional untruth, invention, mendacity, mendacium, misrepresentation, misstatement, perversion, prevarication, untruth
Associated concepts: defamation, libel, perjury, polygraph test, slander

lie

(Be sustainable), verb be allowable, be appropriate, be available, be established, be evident, be fitting, be perrissible, be permitted, be possible, be proper, be suitable, be suited, be supportable, be warranted, exist, extend, stand

lie

(Falsify), verb be dishonest, be untruthful, bear false witness, belie, commit perjury, concoct, counterfeit, delude, deviate from the truth, dissimulate, fable, fabricate, falsify, fib, fool, forswear, invent, misguide, misinform, mislead, misrepresent, misstate, palter, perjure oneself, pervert, pretend, prevaricate, repreeent falsely, swear falsely, tell a falsehood, tell an untruth
Associated concepts: false testimony, lie detector, perjury
See also: bear false witness, canard, deceive, deception, equivocate, evade, fabricate, fake, false pretense, falsehood, falsify, fiction, figment, hoax, invent, misguide, mislead, misrepresent, misrepresentation, misstate, misstatement, palter, perjure, posture, pretend, pretense, pretext, prevaricate, rest, story, subterfuge

TO LIE. That which is proper, is fit; as, an action on the case lies for an injury committed without force; corporeal hereditaments lie in livery, that is, they pass by livery; incorporeal hereditaments lie in grant, that is, pass by the force of the grant, and without any livery. Vide Lying in grant.

References in classic literature ?
Then the lion told his wife, quite proudly, just what he had said to the Doctor.
Help's pretty hard to get these days," said the lion.
By this time the lion's efforts had almost ceased--it was evident that he was being rapidly strangled and as that did not at all suit the purpose of the Tarmangani the latter swung again into the tree, unfastened the rope from above and lowered the lion to the ground where he immediately followed it and loosed the noose about Numa's neck.
Now, indeed, was Numa, the lion, reduced to the harmlessness of Bara, the deer.
The first part of his history had not yet reached him, for, had he read it, the amazement with which his words and deeds filled him would have vanished, as he would then have understood the nature of his madness; but knowing nothing of it, he took him to be rational one moment, and crazy the next, for what he said was sensible, elegant, and well expressed, and what he did, absurd, rash, and foolish; and said he to himself, "What could be madder than putting on a helmet full of curds, and then persuading oneself that enchanters are softening one's skull; or what could be greater rashness and folly than wanting to fight lions tooth and nail?
Look ye, senor," said Sancho, "there's no enchantment here, nor anything of the sort, for between the bars and chinks of the cage I have seen the paw of a real lion, and judging by that I reckon the lion such a paw could belong to must be bigger than a mountain.
It seemed to him that the lion would never leave, and it was a full hour before the angry brute gave up his vigil and strode majestically away across the plain.
No one would think of biting such a little thing, except a coward like me," continued the Lion sadly.
All the other animals in the forest naturally expect me to be brave, for the Lion is everywhere thought to be the King of Beasts.
Three metamorphoses of the spirit have I designated to you: how the spirit became a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.
Long before they reached the cage, they heard the roaring of a great lion and guessed that they had made a successful bag, so it was with shouts of joy that they approached the spot where they should find their captive.
There he was, a great, magnificent specimen--a huge, black-maned lion.