literal rule

literal rule

the rule of statutory interpretation that demands that a statute be interpreted according to its very words regardless of result and regardless of any attempt that can be made to find the intention of the legislator; thus ‘no dogs allowed’ prohibits guide dogs and police dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some changes may occur through "raising the bar" in expectations under current rules, instead of literal rule changes.
Notwithstanding, the implication of the foregoing is that first and foremost the literal rule must be applied.
But the literal rule has its obvious limitations in that in a lot of cases the object of the legislation suffers in deference to its literal interpretation.
In the most strident criticism of the Literal Rule, Professor H.L.A.
Yet, dubious as this sounds, the proponents of the Literal Rule continue to trumpet that it promotes certainty of the law.
In conception then the rule was never meant to be independent of but supplementary to the Literal Rule.
Lord Esher's famous dictum (52) is often put forward as a flag waving proposition for the Literal Rule. In his words: "If the words of an Act are clear, you must follow them, even though they lead to a manifest absurdity.
Though the Mischief rule was the earliest rule of interpretation historically the literal rule came to be mentioned as the rule and the mischief rule as the exception to it.