literature

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literature

noun belles lettres, books, classics, letters, literary output, papers, printed word, publication, reading matter, store of knowledge, work, works, writings, written language, written word
See also: publication
References in periodicals archive ?
The word "crisis" has shadowed Comparative Literature during the course of the development of the discipline for the past hundred years since its birth.
but in addition have a deep impact in our conceptions of literature in general and national literatures in particular.
1s it merely -Commonwealth Literature)) putting on another set of stripes, replacing those of former and now late popular disguises such as "New Literatures in English or "World Literature Written in English))?
Limiting the focus on digital literatures could reduce the accessibility and desirability of English.
When I first published my particular coinage of this term in a 2004 paper entitled "Global Literature and the Technologies of Recognition," (2) I used it to give agency to Sinitic-language literatures produced outside China that have been suffering from extreme theoretical and conceptual anemia in Western academia, where the inability to consider non-Western-language literatures beyond the lens of national literature--the prevalence of the "national allegory" model is a symptom of this--has produced severe myopia towards the multilingual realities of most national literatures including their own.
None of them appears to be a specialist in world literature as a whole but rather in one or two literatures of the world.
Only 170 pages are devoted to the Enlightenment, Classical, and Romantic periods from 1750 to 1821--arguably the most important phase of German literature, when it developed into a modern idiom and a European force, a "world" model for other literatures.
edu or Portland State University Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures Post Office Box 751 Portland, Oregon 97207-0751 (503) 725-8784 (telephone) (503) 725-5276 (fax)
Chaucer, the first great author of English, borrowed freely from French and Italian, as did the internationally-recognized William Shakespeare, who borrowed from these as well as from Greek and Latin sources, as later English authors did from many other languages and literatures.
Although this is an unusual approach to teaching Foreign Languages and Foreign Language Literatures, students become engaged in their own development as readers and interpreters of literature and culture.
The fact that the symposium was held in Spain, the host of two other international conferences on the African diaspora during the 1990s, strongly suggests that African diaspora and African American literature have finally come into their own as world literatures.
Khalil Barhoum is a Senior Lecturer in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages at Stanford University.