loan

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loan

noun accommodation, advance, advancement, aid, allotment, assistance, backing, commodare, credit, dole, entrustment, extension of credit, financing, funding, grant, imprest, moneys borrowed, mutuum, pledge, res commodata, stake, stipend, subsidy, sum entrusted, sum of money borrowed, sum of money lent, temporary accommodation, time payment, trust
Associated concepts: bond, building loan, construction loan, continuing loan, discount, excessive loan, forbearance, graauitous loan, loan association, loan broker, loan value of a policy, mortgage, secured loan, simple loan, stock loan, temporary loan, unpaid loan, usurious loan, usury laws
Foreign phrases: Creditorum appellatione non hi tantum accipiuntur qui pecuniam crediderunt, sed omnes quibus ex qualibet causa debetur.Under the head of “creditors” are included, not only those who have lent money, but all to whom from any cause a debt is owing.

loan

verb accommodate, advance, allow, extend credit, furnish funds, give, lend, permit to borrow, supply funds
See also: capitalize, credit, finance, fund, invest, investment, lease, lend, let

loan

a transaction whereby property is lent or given to another on condition of return or, where the loan is of money, repayment. During the period of the loan the borrower is entitled to use the thing loaned for the purpose agreed between the parties. In a loan of money, the money lent becomes the property of the borrower during the period of the loan against an undertaking to return a sum of equivalent amount either on demand or on a specified date or in accordance with an agreed schedule of repayments.

LOAN, contracts. The act by which a person lets another have a thing to be used by him gratuitously, and which is to be returned, either in specie or in kind, agreeably to the terms of the contract. The thing which is thus transferred is also called a loan. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1077.
     2. A loan in general implies that a thing is lent without reward; but, in some cases, a loan may be for a reward; as, the loan of money. 7 Pet. R. 109.
     3. In order to make a contract usurious, there must be a loan; Cowp. 112, 770; 1 Ves. jr. 527; 2 Bl. R. 859; 3 Wils. 390 and the borrower must be bound to return the money at all events. 2 Scho. & Lef. 470. The purchase of a bond or note is not a loan ; 3 Scho. & Lef. 469; 9 Pet. R 103; but if such a purchase be merely colorable, it will be considered as a loan. 2 John. Cas. 60; Id. 66; 12 S. & R. 46; 15 John. R. 44.

References in periodicals archive ?
The supply of long-term loanable funds increases and tends to depress longer-term interest rates.
Moreover, in equilibrium, financial intermediaries will supply inelastically the total amount of loanable funds at their disposal:
That is, institutions with loanable funds became more reluctant to extend unsecured loans.
Constraint (2b) sets out the credit union's zero-profit constraint and reflects the fact that interbank borrowing or lending is used to offset imbalances in the amount of loanable funds demanded and supplied by members at the chosen interest rates.
This suggests an important issue for further research: to what extent did this decline in the supply of loanable funds weaken regional economies and the more vulnerable banks in those regions, thereby contributing to the bank failure problems?
The foreign banks, which have an access to the cheap loanable funds in the country of their origin and have relatively more freedom to operate, must be instrumental in lessening the cost of borrowing and thus preventing the local industry from being unviable and the exports incompetitive.
A more subtle example of a credit action occurred in 1969 when the Federal Reserve prohibited loan repurchase agreements, and placed new reserve requirements on the Eurodollars that banks were using to raise loanable funds.
Credit and monetary policies are designed to increase the effectiveness of mobilizing and allocating loanable funds and strengthening the integrity of the financial system.
Other contributing factors were financial liberalization in Japan which facilitated Japanese purchases of assets abroad and the developing county debt crisis which raised the supply of loanable funds to the U.
11) Although it would have been preferable to use life insurance reserves rather than assets (since life insurance reserves are a better measure of loanable funds with respect to life insurance policies) these data were not available on a monthly basis.
In response to these losses and to declining demands for credit to finance energy-related activities, Texas banking institutions pulled back from energy lending and began to channel loanable funds to other sectors that still looked relatively attractive, primarily the then-booming real estate sector.