loan

(redirected from Loanable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

loan

a transaction whereby property is lent or given to another on condition of return or, where the loan is of money, repayment. During the period of the loan the borrower is entitled to use the thing loaned for the purpose agreed between the parties. In a loan of money, the money lent becomes the property of the borrower during the period of the loan against an undertaking to return a sum of equivalent amount either on demand or on a specified date or in accordance with an agreed schedule of repayments.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

LOAN, contracts. The act by which a person lets another have a thing to be used by him gratuitously, and which is to be returned, either in specie or in kind, agreeably to the terms of the contract. The thing which is thus transferred is also called a loan. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1077.
     2. A loan in general implies that a thing is lent without reward; but, in some cases, a loan may be for a reward; as, the loan of money. 7 Pet. R. 109.
     3. In order to make a contract usurious, there must be a loan; Cowp. 112, 770; 1 Ves. jr. 527; 2 Bl. R. 859; 3 Wils. 390 and the borrower must be bound to return the money at all events. 2 Scho. & Lef. 470. The purchase of a bond or note is not a loan ; 3 Scho. & Lef. 469; 9 Pet. R 103; but if such a purchase be merely colorable, it will be considered as a loan. 2 John. Cas. 60; Id. 66; 12 S. & R. 46; 15 John. R. 44.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of idle resources, and following Keynesian assumptions, we depict a horizontal supply of loanable funds.
Consider the effects of monetary misperceptions in the market for loanable funds.
That is, abstracting here from the inflow of savings from abroad, the sustainability of the technology-led boom required that the reaction to the rightward shift in the demand curve for investment funds be a northeastward movement along the supply curve of loanable funds, with the consequent market-clearing rate of interest constituting the new natural rate.
The concept of loanable funds in economics is central to the theory of interest rate.
1.6045-2 amendments will clarify that loanable shares do not include shares the broker is prevented from lending by law.
Following earlier studies by Barth, Iden, and Russek [1984; 1985], Cebula [1988], and Hoelscher [1986], the open-economy loanable funds model adopted here is given by:
It would therefore appear to be textually valid to say that if Malthus's brief, rudimentary and scattered remarks on interest are worthy of being elevated to the status of a theory, they would be classified as a loanable funds theory.
The latter issue was explored on three fronts: expanding community bank access to loanable funds, improving rural secondary markets, and developing rural venture capital markets.
Low rate of return on saving instruments together with average double digit inflation in the country reduce supply of credit in loanable funds market and whatever meagre credit available for private sector, in such a grave environment when the government also demand for credit, the rate of lending surges and thus whatever credit remain for private sector goes to in producing output which demand is relatively inelastic consequently cost push inflation spiralled and remaining economic sectors recessed.
The fear of Anglo-Australian labour solidarity, and the continued need for loanable capital in an insecure financial climate, paved the way the final phase (1895-1900) during which an accommodation was found between a cautious, largely middle-class Australian nationalism and a British imperial mission increasingly conscious of its military, naval, and economic weakness.
For this reason, the base of mortgage credit has broadened in recent years, making the provision of mortgages far less dependent on the condition of any one type of financial institution or on the regional supply of loanable funds.