Lombrosian


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Lombrosian

of or relating to the doctrine propounded by the Italian criminologist Cesare Lombroso that criminals are a product of hereditary and atavistic factors and can be classified as a definite abnormal type.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study comprises two distinct sections in which Past deals with what she terms Beccarian introspection and Lombrosian vivisection.
Adler, Mueller, and Laufer, 1991--have made little mention of the racial implications of Lombrosian theory.
Since Conrad elsewhere both borrows and satirizes Lombrosian taxonomies of the kind found in The Female Offender (notably in The Secret Agent), I argue that we might read "The Idiots" as a rendering of the kind of maternal passion that Lombroso contemplates as a cause of crime.
The movie's adoption of a Lombrosian etiology of crime was not
Lombrosian wine in a new bottle: Research on crime and race.
While Liszt pushed for an enlightened punishment policy that would serve more of a social than a moral purpose by attempting to modify the future behavior of the offender more than seeking to exact a "just measure of pain," Aschaffenburg produced one of the first systematic analyses of the causes of crime in his seminal 1903 study Das Verbrechen und seine Bekampfung (translated in English in 1913 as Crime and Its Repression) that stressed both individual-hereditary and social-environmental factors and firmly rejected Lombrosian notions of "born criminals.
The Lombrosian School of Criminology must be regarded as an anomaly to criminology, an orientation that has actually detained the progress of sociological criminology (Quinney, 1970: 57).
80) Rafter has described the Modern Series as opening "a door through which Lombrosian works passed into the United States while closing that door to studies in alternative theoretical traditions.
Although indebted to Nordau's work and still under the sign, albeit on the cusp, of Lombrosian positivism, Alma contemporanea embodies a less dogmatic application of science to literature.
On Lombrosian and biological ideas of crime in both Europe and America, see generally MARY GIBSON, BORN TO CRIME: CESARE LOMBROSO AND THE ORIGINS OF BIOLOGICAL CRIMINOLOGY (2002); NICOLE HAHN RAFTER, CREATING BORN CRIMINALS (1997); and RICHARD F.
The methodological questions that Rafter and Gibson raise and the rationale behind their final solutions are enlightening examples that will prove thought-provoking well beyond the arena of Lombrosian studies.
Here, Winnie seems the very personification of Lombrosian criminality and degeneration.