Lombrosian


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Lombrosian

of or relating to the doctrine propounded by the Italian criminologist Cesare Lombroso that criminals are a product of hereditary and atavistic factors and can be classified as a definite abnormal type.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The study comprises two distinct sections in which Past deals with what she terms Beccarian introspection and Lombrosian vivisection.
For the most part, modern Western criminology texts, with a few isolated exceptions--e.g., Adler, Mueller, and Laufer, 1991--have made little mention of the racial implications of Lombrosian theory.
Since Conrad elsewhere both borrows and satirizes Lombrosian taxonomies of the kind found in The Female Offender (notably in The Secret Agent), I argue that we might read "The Idiots" as a rendering of the kind of maternal passion that Lombroso contemplates as a cause of crime.
The movie's adoption of a Lombrosian etiology of crime was not
And yet you stand by silently when your mentor, the homophobic Lincoln historian David Herbert Donald, endorses the opinion of Charles Strozier when he argues with Lombrosian logic that Lincoln could not have been bisexual because then he would have been "torn between worlds, full of shame, confused, and hardly likely to end up in politics."
Lombrosian wine in a new bottle: Research on crime and race.
The Lombrosian School of Criminology must be regarded as an anomaly to criminology, an orientation that has actually detained the progress of sociological criminology (Quinney, 1970: 57).
His thesis that modern criminology grew out of the convergence of two separate projects the 'governmental' and the 'Lombrosian project' - is not only a corrective to comic-book intellectual histories but a frame for the whole project of the Handbook.
Some studies have even lent credence to the Lombrosian theory that physical anomalies correspond to criminality.
Although indebted to Nordau's work and still under the sign, albeit on the cusp, of Lombrosian positivism, Alma contemporanea embodies a less dogmatic application of science to literature.
(13.) On Lombrosian and biological ideas of crime in both Europe and America, see generally MARY GIBSON, BORN TO CRIME: CESARE LOMBROSO AND THE ORIGINS OF BIOLOGICAL CRIMINOLOGY (2002); NICOLE HAHN RAFTER, CREATING BORN CRIMINALS (1997); and RICHARD F.