Maine

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MAINE. One of the new states of the United State's of America. This state was admitted into the Union by the Act of Congress of March 3, 1820, 3 Story's L. U. S. 1761, from and after the fifteenth day of March, 1820, and is thereby declared to be one of the United States of America, and admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original states in all respects whatever.
     2. The constitution of this state was adopted October 29th, 1819. The powers of the government are vested in three distinct departments, the legislative, executive and judicial.
     3.-1. The legislative power is vested in two distinct branches, a house of representatives and senate, each to have a negative on the other, and both to be styled The legislature of Maine. 1. The house of representatives is to consist of not less than one hundred, nor more than two hundred members; to be apportioned among the counties according to law; to be elected by the qualified electors for one year from the next day preceding the annual meeting of the legislature. 2. The senate consists of not less than twenty, nor more than thirty-one members, elected at the same time, and for the same term, as the representatives, by the qualified electors of the districts into which the state shall, from time to time, be divided. Art. 4, part 2, s. 1. The veto power is given to the governor, by art. 4, part 3, s. 2.
     4.-2. The supreme executive power of the state is vested in a governor, who is elected by the qualified electors, and holds his office one year from the first Wednesday of January in each year. On the first Wednesday of January annually, seven persons, citizens of the United States, and resident within the state, are to be elected by joint ballot of the senators and representatives in convention, who are called the council. This council is to advise the governor in the executive part of government, art. 5, part 2, s. 1 and 2.
     5.-3. The judicial power of the State is distributed by the 6th article of the constitution as follows:
     6.-1. The judicial power of this state shall be vested in a supreme judicial court, and such other courts as the legislature shall, from time to time, establish.
     7.-2. The justices of the supreme judicial court shall, at stated times, receive a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office, but they shall receive no other fee or reward.
     8.-3. They shall be obliged to give their opinion upon important questions of law, and upon solemn occasions, when required by the governor, council, senate, or house of representatives.
     9.-4. All judicial officers; except justices of the peace, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, but not beyond the age of seventy years.
    10.-5. Justices of the peace and notaries public shall hold their offices during seven years, if they so long behave themselves well, at the expiration of which term, they may be re-appointed, or others appointed, as the public interest may require.
    11.-6. The justices of the supreme judicial court shall bold no office under the United States, nor any state, nor any other office under this state, except that of justice of the peace.
     For a history of the province of Maine, see 1 Story on the Const. Sec. 82.

References in periodicals archive ?
In case you don't remember what Maines said, it was: ``Just so you know, we're ashamed President Bush is from Texas.
Radio's beef is over the Chicks -- namely Maines -- bashing country music radio and its fans in the three years since.
I don't give a flying fig what Natalie Maines said about President Bush -- that girl would be annoying and loud at the school Christmas program -- but we feel insulted by what has been a common thread in numerous interviews and articles,'' says Stephanie Wetz, a 38-year-old former Chicks fan from Paris, Texas.
Maines finds that rather than being an invention new to the twentieth century, vibrators have a long and distinguished history.
Maines uses material culture, advertisements, and the medical literature to demonstrate this emergence of the vibrator.
For one thing, singer Natalie Maines was bursting-at-the-seams pregnant.
From the opener, ``Ready to Run,'' to the finale, ``Wide Open Spaces,'' Maines couldn't sit still.